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Item 981 M42 Waffen SS Helmet

This is a good example of a late production Waffen SS helmet. It is a Ckl64 shell with an accountability number in the 2800 range which would likely date it to the early summer of 1943.  The factory finish remains about 92% with honest even wear all around. The ever important Runic shield is a textbook ET/Ckl pattern and rates at a strong 90% showing commensurate even wear and light patina. The pigskin liner shows moderate wear, has it’s original drawstring and is housed in a 1943 Schuberthwerk liner frame. The chinstrap has an RB number nearer to the end-stud than the normal position at the tip. Overall this SS M42 has great shelf appeal. $7350.00

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Item 979 M35 single (former double) decal army Helmet

This is a late production NS 66 M35 which was factory produced in the spring of 1940. It was subsequently repainted over the exterior surface, covering the national color shield but the Army decal was very carefully/precisely masked off. The decal is a textbook C.A. Pocher which was the only decal that NS ever used for standard applications from 1936 to 1943. The inside of the helmet remains in it’;s original factory configuration with a 1940 type acceptance stamp inside the dome. A circular paper label covers half of the acceptance stamp. The aluminum framed liner is dated 1939. The chinstrap is an early aluminum buckle type and although the date is not discernible, it appears by every indication to be original to the helmet. With the textured paint rating at a good 98%, this helmet has wonderful shelf appeal. $2500.00

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Item 980 US M1 Helmet with USMC cover

For those of you who read my descriptions on helmets, perhaps you will agree that I do not make a habit of using flowery adjectives. But I am really tempted to here. This is by far the most original and honest appearing USMC helmets that I have ever had. Although I wasn’t there when the cover was applied to this helmet, I am completely convinced that they have been together since pre-1945. This set has been in my collection since I bought it about 20 years ago at a Kansas city militaria show. The helmet is a very early fixed-bale (with a steel heat-treat number of 38A) it remains in its original factory applied texture and color with excellent matte quality because it has spent  it’s entire life parked under this cover. There is some light surface rust but it wasn’t extensive enough to bleed into the cover as only the faintest bit of rust shows on the cover. The cover retains very good color although it is a bit faded as you can see in the photo of the inside of the helmet without the liner.  There is a bit of wear at the front rim as yo can see in the photos. Overall, there is just enough wear and fading to give it that “Been-there” look to it. The cover is the second-pattern type which eliminated the slits that previously were added to the covers in order to apply foliage. These second pattern covers made their first major appearance in the 1944 battles of Saipan and Peleliu at which time the United states Marine Corps was fielding six divisions.  There is no Eagle/Globe/Anchor emblem applied to the helmet because it apparently left government possession after 1945. (all remaining government stocks of USMC helmet covers had the emblem stamped onto the front.) See the photo where the cover is standing on it’s own in between the shell and the liner. It has been applied to this helmet so long, it has taken on the form of the helmet shell. The helmet liner shows moderate wear to the webbing. It has green anodized “A” washers and is maker marked inside the dome along with a number “4”. The exterior of the liner has been period painted and has the frontal insignia of a Marie Corporal.  The helmet and cover are not named or identified. Anyway.. enough said. The pictures tell the rest; showing one of the most honest and attractive WW2 USMC helmets that you are likely to find. $1500.00

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Item 978 M42 single decal army Helmet

This is an NS66 M42 helmet of likely 1943 production. The maker stamp is located at wearers left. The decal is a textbook C.A.Pocher (as noted above, the only decal used by NS from 1936 to 1943) and remains 92% intact. The factory finish textured paint rates at 95%. You can see in the photos that there are two paint drips/runs at the upper side; a result of wartime quality control. The liner shows moderate wear and has a name penned into the leather. The chinstrap shows every indication of v being original to the helmet but it has been repaired by machine sewing. Overall this is a very attractive example an M42 single decal army that I always refer to as the quintessential German combat helmet. $1650.00

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Item 977 M42 Single decal Luftwaffe Helmet

This is an NS M42 Luftwaffe helmet. Immediately recognizable by the distinct pattern decal that differs from the other standard Luftwaffe types whereas the eagle’s foot does not intrude past the detail line of the upper leg of the swastika. This decal pattern is found only on NS Luftwaffe helmets. The decal rates at 95% as does the factory applied blue-gray textured paint. The wartime steel-framed liner shows moderate wear and remains completely intact. The chinstrap is an odd appearing type and may well be a replaced early Bundeswehr strap. In any case, the condition is not commensurate with the leather of the liner show it should be considered a replacement. Regardless, the helmet displays well at all angles and is a good example of a fairly rare (NS) Luftwaffe M42. $1350.00

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Item 976 M42 No-decal army Helmet

This is a very clean example of the standard M42 no-decal which became general issue after the summer of 1943. (there are even those who subscribe to the theory that these feldgrau painted helmets were to be issued to Luftwaffe troops late in the war; as sort of an Einheitshelm or universal pattern. The shell is a size 66 manufactured by Hkp at the emaillerfabrik in Lauter, Saxony. ( a bit of interesting trivia for you fellow helmet-nerds: the Lauter plant is still standing and still in business producing stamped metal roofing material). This helmet retains 98% of it’s feldgrau paint and it has a liner which is still nicely supple and light tan in color. The chinstrap is a reproduction which was added by a former owner. I’ll let the next owner decide what to do with it. $650.00

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Item 974 M35 Double decal army Helmet

An example from the first month production; 1935

This is a fine example of an M35 helmet made during the first weeks of production. It is a size 64 shell produced by ET in late 1935 (at this point in time, ET was the only manufacturer of the M35) The original smooth texture paint is the correct shade and paint thickness seen in the earliest ETs. The paint rates at 97%. The decals are first pattern Juttner types as would be seen with little variation on ET production through-out the next 8 years. The helmet has a Schuberthwerk liner with maker mark and 1935 date on the frame. The leather bears a die-stamped size marking (which was changed to an inkstamp in early 1936) The dome of the helmet shows a 1935 ET acceptance stamp. These early stamps are known for their slightly smaller size. The steel lot accountability number is 2731 which further illustrates the early production of the shell. The chinstrap is a Rahm-Kampmann dated 1936. (to the best of my knowledge, there is no M31 chinstrap dated 1935. The earliest helmets will be found with either a 1936 dated M31 or an earlier dated M27 carbine-hook strap.) Overall, this is an excellent example of a very rare M35. $5250.00

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Item 973 M40 Single decal army Helmet

Here is an NS66 M40 army helmet with 95% of it’s original factory finish. The textured paint shows very well, the particular shade of feldgrau used during the period (1940-41) and the matte quality is excellent; not being made smooth and shiny by collector handling. The decal is a textbook C.A. Pocher as used by NS for all of it’s factory applications throughout 1936-1943. The leather of the liner is damaged. The chinstrap appears by all indications to be original to the helmet. It is maker marked by the G.Singer lederwarefabrik in Kalttau (occupied Czechoslovakia). At some point since it was installed, the keeper/stud which connects the buckle-end of the strap to the bale has been replaced with a permanent pop-rivet. Overall this helmet has a very good exterior appearance and displays very well. $1350.00

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Item 975 US M1 Helmet, Identified 2nd division

This is a standard US M1 fixed bale helmet. It is in fine condition with 99% of it’s original textured paint. It was period adorned with a US Second infantry division insignia at the front along with a Major oakleaf. A white “follow-me” tactical bar was painted at the rear. The inside is named to Capt. Chauncy harris O-348773. The liner is an early Inland manufactured (counter marked by Firestone) with green “A” washers. Chauncy Harris commanded a company of the 38th regiment when the 2nd Division landed at Omaha beach, June 7, 1944. By the Battle of the Bulge, as a major, he was the second battalion executive officer. The helmet was obtained recently from Harris’ daughter. It is an exceedingly rare example of a helmet actually kept and returned home by the veteran who wore it during the war. Given it’s fine state of preservation and originality, It is a “top-shelf” helmet by any standard. $7500.00

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Item 972 M42 No-decal army Helmet

Here is a very good, basic and honest example of a helmet that would have been issued around 1944. The shell is a ckl64 with 95% of it’s factory finish remaining intact. The matte quality is excellent; not being effected by patina and collector handling. the leather liner is in excellent condition showing only the lightest wear. The chinstrap (unmarked) appears to be original to the helmet. Nice specimens of late war helmets are becoming increasingly difficult to find as the years go by. This one has a lot of merit for it’s displayability. $775.00

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Item 971 M34 style civil police Helmet

This is a Fire-police helmet of pre-war vintage. It was originally obtained from a commercial supplier having been manufactured by an metal-pressing firm identified only by an unknown logo stamped into the rear skirt. The paint remains 95% intact with corresponding Police and party shield insignias. The liner and strap show light wear and remains completely intact as does the detachable leather neck-guard.  Overall a fine example. $425.00

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Item 970 M1895 Prussian pioneer Officer’s spike Helmet

For those of you who always thought you might like to add a nice WW1 spike helmet to your shelf; you may want to consider this one. This is a field worn example of a Prussian Pioneer officer spike helmet. As is correct for all pioneer officer’s, the main hardware (spike, base, trim and wappen) are silver finished brass. The leather body is in excellent condition with no rotten spots or damage to the leather. The form is excellent and is not mis-shaped. All sewing is intact and the artificial silk lining is completely intact. All the fittings are soundly attached and nothing wiggles.  There are no extra holes or any indication that any component was changed, swapped or replaced. The spike base is attached by the correct star-stud bolts with nuts that do not appear to have been turned since they were originally installed. Most of you know me as an afficianado of steel helmets but I have been collecting pickelhauben for 30 years and I can tell you that this one is as straight as an arrow. $1500.00

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Item 969 M40 Single decal army Helmet

A very clean and completely honest example of an M40 single decal army helmet. This is an NS64 with a textbook C.A.Pocher factory applied decal. The paint rates at 95% with the decal remaining 96% intact. The liner shows moderate wear and the chinstrap is by all indications, original to the helmet. If a fellow wanted only a single example of an M40 SD army, this would warrant consideration. $2250.00

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Item 968 M16 camouflaged Helmet

This is an Si66 M16 helmet with a three-color camouflage pattern composed of the most correct and typical colors that I have ever seen. The paint remains 95%+ intact and the colors are vibrant. The liner is toast, I’m afraid, with only two of the pads still present on the steel framed liner. The split-pins show no tampering. The fragments of the original chinstrap are still clinging to the M91 chinstrap posts. But I feel that the exterior condition more than makes up for the insides. $1850.00

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Item 967 Soviet Ssh39 Helmet

This is a very good example of an early war Ssh39 Soviet helmet. The size 2 shell is maker marked by the Lysva metalurgical factory (LMZ) dated 1941. The original paint rates at 95% with an original and beautifully precise stenciled Red star with hammer and sickle at the front. On the inside shell at the front is hand-written “Jandeba Syväri , 21.10.1941”. Jandeba and Syväri are the names of two rivers on the Finnish/Russian front during the Finnish Continuation war with the Soviets from 1941 to 1944. The date could be the date it was captured by a Finnish soldier. The liner of the helmet is the less common of two major types used by LMZ in 1940; being made from a composite material liner attached at three points to the shell via strips of sheet metal. Unfortunately two of these connections are broken causing the liner to be a bit loose. The cloth web chinstrap is riveted at each side and is the correct and original pattern. Overall, this is a very good example of a rare helmet type with ties to the Russian-Finnish war. $1350.00

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Item 966 M15 Czarist Russian legion Helmet

This is a helmet of the Russian expeditionary force which was; by agreement with the French in exhcange for war material, sent to France by Czar Nicholas in mid 1916. Some 40,000 Russian soldiers were incorporated into 3 brigades and served on the western front. Many of them were equipped with these helmets; specially produced by France for the Russian legion. I have long been an aficionado of the Russian M15 helmet and have in all my years seen/owned less than 10 of them. This is one of the nicer examples I have run across. The M15 shell retains 95% of it’s original dark brown color. It is a medium size shell with it’s first pattern liner marked “B1” meaning it is the “B” sized shell and the “1” sized liner. (French helmets were sized A, B and C with each helmet accommodating liners sized 1, 2 or 3. A complicated system. The all important frontal badge is 100% original and by all indications, original to this helmet. The lightweight brown leather chinstrap is original to the helmet with it’s rivet connections being intact and original. The leather itself is intact and sound which is in itself a rarity among M15 French helmets. Overall, this helmet ticks all the boxes. It is a rare surviving example of a ubiquitous helmet, It is in fine condition with all intact components and it is 100% original. $3950.00

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Item 965 M37 Hungarian army helmet

Here is a good honest example of the Hungarian M37 helmet with a first pattern Liner (1937-1943). This is just the type of helmet worn by the Hungarian 2nd army at Stalingrad and the Don river basin.  Original finish and well marked with the maker GY and size 64 shell. The liner and strap are intact and sound. $1700.00

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  The wire was zinc-coated by immersion after it was woven into the mesh, which is correct for the period. Further the wire was painted to dull-down the surface before being applied to the helmet. (new manufactured wire would have been bright and shiny; thus completely inappropriate for applying as it is, to the surface of a combat helmet). This is particularly noticeable in the attachment hooks at the rim of the helmet. Overall; the patina of the wire appears to match exactly to the other helmet components. Even if you/the reader are not in the market for a chicken-wire helmet, you should take note of these signs for  reference when deciding a particular chicken-wire camouflaged helmet in the future. Long story short… it is my opinion that this is a genuine chicken-wire helmet and would serve as a fine example in any collection. The liner shows good honest wear and the chinstrap is present, although broken.  $3700.00

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Item 968 M35 Double decal Luftwaffe Helmet

This is an ET66 double decal Luftwaffe helmet of late 1938-early 1939 vintage. The smooth texture paint remains 90% intact with minor scratches and wear evenly distributed along the exterior surface. The “Droop-tail” eagle decal remains like-wise 90% intact; as does the national color shield. The liner frame bears a date of 1938 which corresponds to the 4090 steel lot number, dating the shell to late 1938/early 1939. The chinstrap is maker marked and dated 1940. Overall, this is a very decent example of a pre-war Luftwaffe M35. $2450.00

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Item 967 M42 Single decal Army Helmet

Here is an ET66 M42 single decal army helmet with a textbook ET pattern eagle decal which remains 95% intact. The helmet’s painted finish shows little wear, with good crisp texture and very good matte quality; not having become shiny by collector handling. The wartime steel framed liner appears to be unworn with only storage wear. At first glance, it appeared to me possible that this liner was replaced into this helmet. If so, the split-pins were reset correctly and very convincingly. (I do not usually photograph split-pin prongs but have done so in this case so you are able to judge for yourself. ) The helmet overall displays very swell and has a very appealing patina. $1150.00

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Item 966 M35 Double decal Police Helmet

This is an ET64 schutzpolizei helmet from ET’s 1939 contract. (I believe that ET received only two large contracts for police helmets; the earlier one being in 1937). The helmet has seen some where and tear. The smooth texture factory finish rates at 85-90%. The decals are in commensurate condition with various scrapes and chips. The liner shows considerable wear and one of the ‘fingers’ is torn near the base. The re-inforced liner frame is dated 1939. All in all, the helmet shows a lot of character and is 100% honest. $975.00

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Item 965 M40 Single decal Kriegsmarine Helmet

This Q66 helmet is from F.W.Quist’s single (and fairly short-lived) contract to supply helmets to the navy, which took place in 1940. The decal is an unmistakable layered gold eagle with the expected slightly green-ish detail lines. The textured paint finish rates at 95% however the area around the decal appears to have been cleaned or some effect has taken place there, which I don’t know the cause of. It is not too distracting when the this very good KM decal is taken into account. You can notice in the close-up photos that there is some feldgrau paint around the end-stud of the chinstrap. The helmet is well named by ‘Knigge’. The leather of the liner is in fine shape with moderate wear and no damage. Overall, it’s a good basic example of a Kriegsmarine M40. $1000.00

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Item 964 M42 single decal Luftwaffe Helmet

A decent example os an NS Luftwaffe M42 in shell size 64. The eagle decal is a good example of the distinctive NS pattern (note how the talons of the eagles foot do not intrude past the exterior lines of the swastika as they appear to do in decals of other manufacturers. The helmets painted finish remains 90% intact. The pigskin leather of the liner shows age and wear with damage to one of the ‘fingers’ The chinstrap has been shortened a bit. NS M42s are less common than any of the other manufacturers. $1050.00

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Bargain basement # 207

One of the nicest Luftschutz gladiator helmets I have ever had. This one retains 99% paint and decal with a clean liner and chinstrap. The former owner has written his name and address on the lining. The house is still standing; according to Google-earth and is a stately town-house in Union city Indiana. (If you want to go knocking on the door, do NOT tell them I sent you.) The helmet costs $425.00

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Bargain basement # 206

This is a very decent example of what has become known as the “M34” civil light-weight helmet. These helmets were produced on order by various uniform and headgear supply companies during the Third Reich; catering to personnel of paramilitary organizations whose members often had to buy thier own uniforms/headgear. This example retains 95% of it’s original factory finish black paint. The police decals remain strong and with good details. The liner and chinstrap are intact and sound. There is a label inside the dome at the front indicating the helmet was sold through the company of Heinrich Mandelartz of Aachen. Interestingly this company is still in business; supplying various equestrian products such as tack gear, uniforms and (of course) riding helmets. Overall a fine example of a civil police helmet $350.00

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Item 915 M18 style “droop-bill” SS parade helmet

This is an M18 “style” commercially produced helmet which was used almost exclusively by the SS for their early parade helmets. By that, I mean that although the manufacturer is not known; nearly each and every helmet of this specific shell type has been found to be associated with the SS, either by added insignia or by a name/unit marking somewhere on the helmet. Although significantly less than half of the known examples bear any insignia, I have personally never seen a helmet of this type used by another service branch. The last two photos show this helmet in comparison with one which has been adorned with 1935 era C.A.Pocher decals. As t the helmets condition, the paint remains 90% intact. The liner has been patterned after the military M27 style and is permanently riveted to the shell at three points. The chinstrap is permanently riveted to the leather liner frame at each side. Overall the leather is fragile but reasonably intact. This particular helmet is not named or identified by unit. The below image shows the SD man at left wearing a helmet of this exact type with SS insignia.  $1850.00

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Item 618 M35 single decal army helmet

This is an NS64 which was produced in the spring of 1940; during the transitional period between M35 production specifications and the new regulations instituted in March. The helmet is an M35 shell finished to M40 specs; being painted with the new M40 feldgrau but no texture added. The single army decal is a textbook C.A.Pocher as found on all NS helmets between 1936 and the end of decal application in 1943. The paint rates at 98% as does the decal. The dome bears a 1940 type non-dated acceptance stamp. All components are in “matching” condition. Overall the helmet is a well-balanced and excellent condition example of a rare transitory model. ON HOLD

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Item 617 M42 “Organization Todt” helmet

There are no original photographs of Organization Todt workers wearing helmets with insignias (Neither the stenciled version nor the decal version) but I have seen enough evidence overt the years to convince me that there are original examples which fit into a specific period of time. For instance; in 2010 a friend of mine in Normandy received a response to his advertisement from a woman in Brittany who had about a dozen M42s bearing the stenciled “OT”. I had the occasion to examine a good portion of this find. The helmets were in various stages of decomposition but were each made by Ckl with lot numbers in the 4500 range. I believe that a large number of helmets were dispatched from the ET/Ckl plant to workers preparing the coastal defenses in France during the spring of 1944. In addition to this lot found in Brittany, I have; between 1995 and 2015 examined a total of 4 helmets in collections in the US which bear this stenciled OT insignia. 3 of them had veteran provenance and each of those came from Normandy in the summer of 1944.

This example is a 1944 produced Ckl64 with a 4500 lot number. The original factory paint remains 95% The liner and strap show moderate and even wear. The stenciled insignia is; in my opinion, 100% original and of textbook design; matching every example I have ever seen which I took as an original. Overall, this is an exceptional specimen of an extremely rare helmet. $5500.00

As a side note; The OT stenciled insignia on this helmet has been profiled in my 2016 book “Helmet decals of the Third Reich” by B&D publishing

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Item 616 M35 single decal army helmet

This is an SE66 which was produced in the spring of 1940; during the transitional period between M35 production specifications and the new regulations instituted in March. The helmet is an M35 shell finished to M40 specs; being painted with the new M40 feldgrau with very light texture. The single army decal is a textbook ET pattern as found on SE helmets. The paint rates at 95% with the decal remaining 98% intact.  All components are in “matching” condition. Overall the helmet is a well-balanced and excellent condition example of a rare transitory model. SOLD

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Item 618 M35 single decal army helmet

This is an NS64 which was produced in the spring of 1940; during the transitional period between M35 production specifications and the new regulations instituted in March. The helmet is an M35 shell finished to M40 specs; being painted with the new M40 feldgrau but no texture added. The single army decal is a textbook C.A.Pocher as found on all NS helmets between 1936 and the end of decal application in 1943. The paint rates at 98% as does the decal. The dome bears a 1940 type non-dated acceptance stamp. All components are in “matching” condition. Overall the helmet is a well-balanced and excellent condition example of a rare transitory model. 

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Item 617 M42 “Organization Todt” helmet

There are no original photographs of Organization Todt workers wearing helmets with insignias (Neither the stenciled version nor the decal version) but I have seen enough evidence overt the years to convince me that there are original examples which fit into a specific period of time. For instance; in 2010 a friend of mine in Normandy received a response to his advertisement from a woman in Brittany who had about a dozen M42s bearing the stenciled “OT”. I had the occasion to examine a good portion of this find. The helmets were in various stages of decomposition but were each made by Ckl with lot numbers in the 4500 range. I believe that a large number of helmets were dispatched from the ET/Ckl plant to workers preparing the coastal defenses in France during the spring of 1944. In addition to this lot found in Brittany, I have; between 1995 and 2015 examined a total of 4 helmets in collections in the US which bear this stenciled OT insignia. 3 of them had veteran provenance and each of those came from Normandy in the summer of 1944.

This example is a 1944 produced Ckl64 with a 4500 lot number. The original factory paint remains 95% The liner and strap show moderate and even wear. The stenciled insignia is; in my opinion, 100% original and of textbook design; matching every example I have ever seen which I took as an original. Overall, this is an exceptional specimen of an extremely rare helmet. 

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Item 616 M35 single decal army helmet

This is an SE66 which was produced in the spring of 1940; during the transitional period between M35 production specifications and the new regulations instituted in March. The helmet is an M35 shell finished to M40 specs; being painted with the new M40 feldgrau with very light texture. The single army decal is a textbook ET pattern as found on SE helmets. The paint rates at 95% with the decal remaining 98% intact.  All components are in “matching” condition. Overall the helmet is a well-balanced and excellent condition example of a rare transitory model. 

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Item 612 US M1917 helmet

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Item 611 M35 Heer camouflage helmet

 

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Item 606 Kriegsmarine Pith helmet shields by Gustav Brehmer

Here is an original matching pair Kriegsmarine pith helmet shields. They are unmakrked but are commensurate with the pattern made by Gustave Brehmer. The prongs are completely intact. The finish remains 90% intact. 100% original. $250.00

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Item 605 US M1 fixed-bale helmet w/ Inland liner

This one is in great condition with 98% of it’s original textured exterior paint. The shell is an early one with a 321C heat treat number. The liner is marked Inland 36 and was period repainted over the exterior. The webbing is in excellent condition and is topped off with an excellent green hardware leather chinstrap. The inside dome of the steel shell shows effects of moisture over the years but the helmet diplays wonderfully. $495.00

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Item 601 US M1917 helmet

This is a great example of the US M1917 helmet. It shows just a tiny bit of wear with no abuse and no post-war damage. 100% original in every regard with it’s original textured paint and a sound liner and chinstrap. The original owner; Sargent Raymond L. Gatta has written his name and service number inside. The size is 7. The price is $225.00

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Item 989 M35 Double decal SS-VT Helmet

Identified as having been worn by Irmfried Eberl; 1st commandant of Treblinka

This helmet comes from my own collection. It is a very good example of a double decal SS helmet from the first batch of SS VT helmets produced by Quist in 1938. It has a 1938 dated liner frame. The chinstrap; which is certainly original to the helmet, bears the “V.A. SS 1938” marking that was stamped into chinstraps issued with the first Quist contract. (The markings show considerable age/wear but I have made a comparison with an excellent example for those of you who may not be familiar with this extremely rare SS chinstrap marking). The helmet originally left the factory with the standard feldgrau finish applied by Quist to helmets of their Heer and SS contracts. It was subsequently painted black on the exterior as well as the interior skirt and a set of C.A. Pocher after-market decals were applied. The helmet was issued to an SS man as his “second helmet” for the purposes of parade use. Prior to 1939, every member of the SS Verfungungstruppe was issued two helmets; one for field use and one for dress. The helmet was later repainted in a particular shade of feldgrau which has been seen on other SS re-issues. A third set of decals; another pair of C.A.Pocher after-market types were applied over this third coat of paint. It is important to note that I refer to C.A. Pocher decals as “after-market” because at this period of time, Pocher decals were just that; decals intended for after-market application rather than application at a factory. Pocher decals were generally not applied at any of the helmet factories until later when supply issues caused them to be used for a short time by both the ET and the Quist factories. So; in short, this helmet is in it’s third incarnation and in that sense is one of many such early SS-VT helmets which were re-utilized during the war years. You can see in the decal close-up that there are three layers of decals. It remains in a sound and attractive condition with 90% paint and a striking runic shield. The leather shows wear but is overall intact with no damage.  As to it’s attribution to Irmfried Eberl. The helmet bears Eberl’s name twice imprinted on the leather and the dome of the helmet shell. Why is it assumed to be the helmet of this specific Eberl? Note that there are two other names “Albert” and “Messmer”. On the Auschwitz rolls available at the Holocaust memorial website, there is a messmer and several men with the surname Albert. This is the link. After his short but disastrous tenure as commandant of Treblinka, Eberl was transfered to the Auschwitz death camp. It was there after some months that he left the SS altogether (serving the rest of the war with the medical department of the Wehrmacht). He would have turned in his gear, leaving the helmet as garrison property; to be re-issued to later personnel. The fact that the other names are those of men identified in the Auschwitz rolls leaves the attribution of this helmet beyond any reasonable doubt. The appearance of the helmet and it’s multiple re-issues to at least 4 different men is an aspect which is common to most known “camp helmets”.

Eberl had quite a career if you care to look him up. First was his participation with the T4 euthanasia program at Brandenberg followed by his assignment as the first commandant of Treblinka from July/August 1942, where he presided over one of the bloodiest two month periods of a single facility during the entire history of the Holocaust. Some 160,000 people were liquidated under Eberl’s watch, however he apparently was as wretched as an administrator as he was as a person. Upon the first inspection of the camp by head of Operation Reinhard; Christian Wirth, the state of the camp with it’s piles of unburied corpses caused Eberl to be immediately replaced with Franz Stangl. Eberl later served at Auschwitz and returned for a time to the newly reconsituted T4 program at Brandenberg; ending the war with the Wehrmacht medical department. After May, 1945, Eberl returned to his medical practice in Blaubeuren near Ulm. He was apprehended in January 1948 by the American authorities. When he became aware that the Americans had no doubt as to his identity, he hanged himself in his jail cell. Eberl’s helmet was brought to the US by a veteran from Illinois ( who presumably captured it at some location where Auschwwitz personnel were relocated in the west after the camp was abandoned in the face of the Russian advance in January 1945) The veteran died and his family sold the helmet at their garage sale. It ended up in a collection for many years and only recently was researched by Kelly hicks.

A helmet of this nature is not for everyone. It has born witness to depravity unequaled in all of the human experience. But as a historical artifact, it has few equals. The helmet is priced at $29,500

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An M40 with chicken wire

 A half-basket wire cage attached to a circumferential baling wire ring attached to the rim of the helmet

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Item 982 M42 No-decal Helmet

This is an EF66 late war helmet with 95% of it’s original finish. The liner is sound and intact with no damage. The chinstrap appears to be original to the helmet as it has the same age-wear as the rest. Overall a good honest example. $775.00

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Item 981 M40 Kriegsmarine Helmet

This helmet is a size 68 shell manufactured by EF. It seems that EF was the major producer of KM helmets after 1940. The decal is a textbook layered type with detail lines that have that very slight greenish hue; which is a feature one should always look for with a true KM decal. The helmet is overall in very balanced condition and is completely honest. The chinstrap is a type which has a metal wire keeper. This strap is a recognized variant and seems exclusive to Kriegsmarine helmets. A great example all the way around. $2800.00

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Item 980 M40 Ex-Chicken-wire camouflage Helmet

This is a Q64 M40 that was overpainted and wrapped with a full-basket of large mesh chicken-wire. At that time, several subtle shades of paint were added as further camouflage. The wire was subsequently removed by the pattern remains quite visible in the paint. The liner shows moderate wear and the chinsytrap appears to be original to the helmet. This is another example which I describe as “well balanced and completely honest” $1350.00

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Item 979 M35 Ex-Chicken-wire overpaint Helmet

This is an ET64 M35 which was re-issued after being over-painted in a fairly heavily textured paint; covering both of the original factory applied decals. A wartime steel-framed liner was installed. The liner is missing it’s drawstring but remaoins in otherwise very nice shape. The chinstrap appears original to this helmet and has been period cut short to remove slack. The helmet was at one time wrapped in a full-basket of large mesh chicken-wire which was subsequently removed. The remains of the markings which this wire caused to the paint are visible. This helmet is a great combat piece. $1250.00

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Item 978 M42 Single decal army Helmet

Here is a great example of what I have always called the Quintessential German combat helmet; The M42 single decal army. This is an ET66 shell with 95% paint and a textbook ET/Ckl decal. The chinstrap appears to be original to the helmet. The liner shows light to moderate wear. It has 7 “fingers” rather than the normal 8 due to the positioning of the leather strip when the cutters sized it. Another example of a well-balanced and completely honest helmet. $1400.00

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Item 977 M42 Single decal army Helmet

This is a decent example of an M42 single decal army. This is an ET68 shell with 92% paint and a textbook ET/Ckl decal. The lot number places it’s likely production period during late 1942/early 1943. The liner shows a good amount of wear and age but is intact; although the drawstring is missing.  $1300.00

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Item 976 M42 un-issued No-decal Helmet

Let’s not forget the humble late-war M42 No-decal. This Hkp66 is in un-issued condition with a lot number indicating likely production in mid-late 1944. It just has a bit of scuffing to the finish from storage. It is quite probable that no chinstrap was ever installed. (Helmets did not come from the factory with chinstraps. When being issued his helmet, the soldier was also handed a chinstrap and instructed to put it on.). Late war Hkp’s are known for their slightly lighter and less grey/more green paint color. This example is textbook. $650.00

Here is a fun bit of trivia. Below is a Google earth image of the former Sachische emaillerwerke plant in present day Lauter-Bernsbach. This is where all SE/Hkp helmets were made. They manufacture metal roofing materials today

Item 974 M35 Double decal army Helmet

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Item 973 M35 Double decal army Helmet

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Item 972 M35 Double decal army Helmet

Here is an all original M16 helmet that is complete; showing moderate wear and age. The Si64 shell has 90% paint. The liner is composed of three chrome-tanned leather pads mounted on a 1917 period metal frame. The drawstring is original to the helmet; as is the steel mounted M91 chinstrap. The strap has been held up over the visor forever. Overall this helmet has a completely honest appearance as if it were removed from a doughboys foot-locker yesterday. $1050.00

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Item 971 M35 Double decal army Helmet

This is an ET64 M18 helmet with a very nice shell, retaining 95% of it’s original Felgrau paint. The M18 liner has all three pads intact and in reasonably good condition. Only one pull-through in a string hole of the front pad. $675.00

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Item 970 M35 Double decal army Helmet

Here is a nice, slightly used M1 helmet of very early production. Heat-treat number is 180A dating this one to 1942. The original McCord factory textured paint rates at 98%. The liner is a third pattern Hawley completed by an intact original chinstrap with green buckle, rivet and end clips. The body of the liner has a couple dents on top with some minor staining. The liner has a black lined horizontal gold bar indicating a fresh second lieutenant in training. A rare helmet with a modicum of charm. $900.00

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Item 969 M35 Double decal army Helmet

Here is a fine condition US M1 fixed bale helmet. I cannot make out the heat treat number but it has the slightly longer chinstrap which came into use in early 1943. The shell retains 98% original textured paint. The webbing is in excellent condition all the way around. The Westinghouse liner has black anodized “A” washers. The liner strap has a break near the buckle. The helmet is complete with a 1944-45 US produced small mesh liner with elastic strap. (most other larger mesh nets were provided to us by the British as “reverse Lend-lease”). With the exception of the liner strap, this helmet would be near impossible to upgrade. $475.00

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Item 968 M35 Double decal army Helmet

This is a good solid fixed bale helmet with 95% of it’s original depot repaint in WW2 O.D. The liner is an Inland which was over-marked by Firestone in 1943. (The Inland company recieved their first contracts for the M1 Carbine in late 1942 and found that they could only produce so much given the restrictions imposed by the war production board. So they dropped their production of liners and went for the more profitable M1 carbine production. All their remaining stocks of incimpleted liners were sold off to other companies; this one having been shipped to the firestone company for completion and delivery to the army). The liner has an original Seargent insignia applied to the front using bits of snipped medical tape.  

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Item 967 M35 Double decal army Helmet

One of the nicest examples of a basic US M1917 helmet that I have seen in a while. At over a hundred years old, it still retains 95% original paint with a sound liner and strap showing only moderate wear. It has a full instruction tag at the middle of the dome. You’ll love this one. $225.00

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Item 940 M35 Double decal army Helmet

One of the cleanest and most attractive examples I have been able to offer in quite a while; this ET66 M35 helmet retains 98% of it’s finish; which is a shade of feldgrau with a distinct grey-ish hue. The decals are typical ET factory applied and remain 99% intact. The acceptance stamp inside the dome is quite faint but I believe I can make out a 1939 date. The aluminum reinforced liner frame is marked and dated 1939. The lot number corresponds to mid-1939 production. The leather of the liner shows only light wear and has some minor flaking around the edge. The chinstrap is a pre-1940 example with aluminum hardware. The maker mark is quite difficult to make out but I believe it to be Rahm-Kampmann of Wuppertal and the date is likely 1939. Overall this one is a real beauty in every regard. SOLD

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Item 939 M35 Double decal Schutzpolizei helmet.

This is a very nice example of an NS produced police helmet and is a relatively late example from their 1938 contract with the Schutzpolizei. The police decal is one of two types used by NS for the 1938 contract. (The other type is the less attractive “fuzzy” eagle decal which is detailed in the police chapter of my book on helmet decals). The helmet shell size is 64. The paint is textbook for NS 1938-1939 and remains 98% intact; having a good matte quality which was not effected by handling wear and patina. The 1938 acceptance stamp inside the dome is clear and vivid. The aluminum framed liner is dated 1938. The split-pins are the sub-contracted types used by NS beginning in 1939 so I believe this helmet may have actually been assembled early in 39. The “E” prefix of the steel accountability number further indicates production later than most examples encountered. So getting past all of the technical gobble-de-gook… This is a textbook example which is in wonderful condition. $3950.00

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Item 934 US M1 Navy ship-board helmet 

Here is a very good example of an early fixed-bale M1 helmet that saw service with the US navy. I have found that helmets which are verifiable as pre-1945 navy-used generally have this darker shade of “battleship grey” which is more grey than blue. The helmet has a rack number on the front which is slightly off center. The Westinghouse liner is an early one with green anodized “A” washers and an early style sweatband with the wire buckle at the rear. The liner shows moderate wear and there is no damage to the webbing or chinstrap. Overall this is a very good example of a helmet-type that every US M1 enthusiast should have. SOLD

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Item 933 M28 “Kelly” helmet

This is an M28A1 helmet as worn by men of the US army during the inter-war period and until the M1 began to replace it in late 1941. US soldiers and Marines were wearing these on Corrigidor when the Japs came. This example shows moderate wear but no abuse. The leather dome pad is still attached. The chinstrap is intact and sound. The helmet had been period repainted and remains in very nice overall condition. $225.00

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Item 890 M42 late war no-decal helmet

This is a Ckl66 with na 5725 lot number indicating likely production in late 1944. The feldgrau paint has very light (almost un-noticable) texture yet remains with good matte quality; having not been effected by patina and collector handling. The liner date cannot be seen but could very well be dated 1944. The leather shows very late war tanning quality. The chinstrap is maker marked an dated 1940 but appears to be very close in condition to the helmet that it could be originally applied. Overall a very honest and well balanced late war helmet. $875.00

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Item 887 M4

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Item 856 Imperial German M18 helmet

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Mark: I have also added photos here of my own Luftwaffe badge which has been deemed a fake. It’s as beautiful as yours.

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Item 864 M35 double decal Luftwaffe helmet

This is an ET 68 Double decal Luftwaffe helmet of 1939 vintage. (for some reason the second digit of the 4000 series lot number has been lightly stamped or neglected altogether. Just goes to illustrate that the Germans had Friday afternoons like the rest of us) The helmet was lightly sprayed over the exterior to conform with 1940 specifications about decals. The eagle decal was painted around but the National colors shield was covered. Subsequent age and wear has worn off a lot of this over-paint and partially exposed the color shield. Please study the photo and notice that the partial showing of the color shield is NOT the result of somebody trying to expose it by abrasion. The droop-tail decal is a very good looking example. The liner shows substantial age/wear but remains intact. The wartime chinstrap has been shortened to remove slack. If you have been looking for a well-balanced first pattern Luftwaffe decaled helmet, you may want to consider this dandy specimen. $1600.00

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Item 863 Type 90 Japanese army helmet

Japanese combat helmets. You love them or you don’t. I think they are an iconic item of the war in the south pacific. Along with the samurai sword and the signed “meatball” flag; they were the most popular of items brought home from the tropical islands. But enough of my commercial…

This is a very good combat used example of the type 90 helmet; dated Showa 18 (1943). Very nice paint, original start (which is a bit vaulted) full length straps and a liner which shows use but no abuse and no significant post-war damage. It is size marked large with the hand-painted white Kanji Character. The soldier painted his name in Red at the front rim. Honest as a conservative Judge. $1000

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Item 862 M38 Paratrooper helmet

Find a better example. I dare you. I double dare you. This is an “off the shelf- right out of the bin” unissued Paratrooper helmet which; judging from the steel lot number, was produced in early 1944. The liner is nearly spotless. The leather is as supple as glove leather. The straps are simply the best which I have ever seen. The bolts are vented slots at the sides and solid slots at the rear. This is the most common configuration which I have noticed with paratrooper helmet when we see them with mixed bolts. Each of the four is double nutted. When this one sells, I will literally shed a tear as I put it into the box. (is that spreading it a bit thick? Maybe…) No one can deny this one is “top shelf”. $6500.00

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Item 861 M35 Double decal army helmet

This is a very nice M35 ET64 double decal army helmet. 95% paint and 97% decals with a liner that shows moderate wear. The lot number is right around that 4000 mark which means manufacture and assembly in early 1939. My bet would be January. The final assembly acceptance stamp is dated 1938 (as is the chinstrap) but I remain convinced that they didn’t change the dates of thier acceptance stamps on January 1st of any given year. The helmet is named to a Hauptmann Schneider and all components appear to be commensurate in condition making this as honest as it is attractive. $5250.00

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Item 860 M35 Double decal Luftwaffe helmet

Who doesn’t love a crispy Droop-tail eagle decal? This 1939 vintage M35 has 97% of it’s original feldblau paint and has retained it’s matte quality with no adverse effects caused by patina and collector handling. The shell is an ET62 and one can see in the areas of paint damage that there is an underlying coat of feldgrau. This helmet was originally painted for an army contract but before it eft the factory, it underwent service-branch re-assignment and was painted again and decaled as a Luftwaffe. The liner shows light wear and the chinstrap appears by all indications to be original to the helmet. You can see where the aluminum has worn onto the leather at the bales. As the strap is dated 1941, it was plainly added during the war; perhaps when the helmet was issued from old stock. It apparently has not seen a lot of use. $3250.00

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Item 859 M35 Double decal Luftwaffe helmet

I love helmets in this condition. Not minty but not bad at all. And 100% honest and well balanced. The shell is an ET64 of late 1938 vintage. Decals and paint rate at 95%. The liner shows light wear and the chinstrap appears by all indications to be original to the helmet. You can see where the aluminum has worn onto the leather at the bales. The strap is made by a company known for having Luftwaffe contracts. It is dated 1939 as is the liner frame itself. Most likely this helmet was assembled in early 1939. $2450.00

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Item 858 M16 camouflage helmet

I really don’t find these very often anymore. This is perhaps the first nice one I have had in a couple of years. The Q66 shell was painted in a typical geometric pattern composed of three colors with black separation lines according to the Ludendorff order of spring 1918. The paint remains 90%+ intact with vivid colors. The liner is complete but the fingers have had the drawstring holes pulled through. This helmet has it’s original chinstrap and you can tell that the chinstrap posts have been slightly peened over to keep it from falling off as 95% of them did (unless they simply rotted away). This helmet displays very well from all angles $2200.00

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Item 857 M35 texture painted combat helmet.

I LIKE TO THINK THAt helmets like this are what “German helmets inc” is all about. They don’t come much more honest or full of charecter than this one. The helmet started out life as an SE64 Double decal army. It was issued to at least two different fellows during the span of it’s combat career. At some point during the war it recieved a thick coat of heavy texture green paint and “Klauss” painted his name on the inside skirt. The paint has some spots of damage in all the right places. The liner shows a good amount of wear. The chinstrap appears by all indications to be original to the helmet and is marked by G. Scheile, Loburg. You can see the painted name of a former owner at the rear. The green over paint is spilt onto parts of the liner frame. I would imagine that this helmet has been to Russia and back; probably taken by some GI in the last stages of the war. What had it and it’s owner(s) seen? $1500.00

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Swords

1- $475. No maker name. Unknown maker

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2 – Holler $475

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5 -Alcoso – $450

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6 -WKC pattern # 1058 – $550

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7 – Eickhorn “Scharnhorst” $500

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8 – Eickhorn – $425

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9 – WKC – $475

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10- WKC $425

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11 – WKC – $475

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12 – E. Pack & sohne -$575

13- F.W. Holler Pattern #32 $425

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17- F.W. Holler $475

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18- F.W. Holler Pattern #40  $460

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20- Pack pattern # 61, green eyes – $595

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21- Alcoso – $425

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23- WKC pattern # 84 – small spots on blade –  $385

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26- Eickhorn Leopard head $450

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27- WMW leopard – $525.00

 

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NEW! M38 Fallschirmjaeger helmets

I have been working on this for a long time. I started with the idea that there is not a reasonable quality reproduction of the M38 paratrooper helmet offered anywhere for a reasonable price. All there has been so far are the mega cheap Chinese crappy reproductions on eBay for under a hundred dollars. OR you can spring for one of the ultra high quality ones offered from various sellers for $600 to $1000. I set out to see if a reasonable quality M38 could be offered for a reasonable price. 

The shells – Back in the 1990s Rollin Curtis from “At the front” had a run of very tolerable-quality size 71 cm shells made in Asia. These helmet shells were the first attempt at decent copies and they compare favorably to originals; having the correct visor shape and height of the shell vs circumference. Rollin never ended up having the rest of the components produced so the shells sat around. I decided to get a supply of these.

The liners – I found a guy in California who could make the aluminum frames. I bought them from him and sent them to a leather-worker in New Jersey to have the leather and rubber padding installed into them.

The bolts – I found a supply of the first quality steel vented spanners which had been made in Czechoslovakia back in the early 90s.

The straps – Very good reproductions made in Asia.

The paint – My own mixture of 1940 spec feldgrau which is applied with 220 grit aluminum oxide powder

So we’ve got shells and straps made in Asia, Liners made in the USA and bolts made in Europe. The resulting helmets are assembled and painted here in my shop. They are intended to replicate a mid-war helmet with slotted spanners and RB numbered liners. I think I have done a fairly good job of putting together a helmet of reasonable quality and offered at a reasonable price. The helmets are sold WITHOUT decals until such a time as I can find a supply of suitable quality Eagle decals. As you can see, the leather liners vary according to color but each is on the correct grade and weight of leather.

 

The Helmets are a shell size 71 and I can supply them with liner Size 60.  No other sizes are possible at this point. I am sold out of the liners in sizes 59 and 61. No way to restock unless I start the whole project over again.

Price $395.00

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