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Original helmets

   

ORIGINAL HELMETS

 

This page updated on September 1, 2021

I also updated the “Bargain basement”.

 

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Item 872 M35 Re-issued Ex-DD army helmet helmet

This helmet started out life as a double decal army. In 1940 it was painted over entirely on the exterior with both decals covered. A Heer eagle decal was then applied at wearers left. The decal rates at 95% with the brushed paint remaining 95% intact with only minor scuffs. The matte quality is excellent with no wear or shine caused by collector handling. The inside of the shell and it’s original factory installed aluminum framed liner are in original condition. The chinstrap was installed in 1940 and appears by all indications to be original to the helmet. Overall this is a “one looker” and remains one of the more honest examples I have seen. SOLD

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Item 871 M42 No-decal army helmet w/original net

This is an original EF66m M42 no-decal helmet with an original net. It is my considered and firm belief that this net has been with this helmet since 1944-45. I mean that. I have been over this thing with a fine tooth comb. I have seen a good number of nets ion my day and none has shown such clear sign of being original to the helmet upon which it sits. The German had only one type of issue net and it was issued along with two wire strands which were meant to be inserted under the liner frame and bent over the rim of the helmet for fastening the strands of the net. (see the actual OKW illustration from the in Ludwig Baer’s book.) The wire hooks are present with this helmet and the netting has been stretched over them since the war. The ends of the “veil hooks” are intertwined to keep the veil portion of the net wrapped around the helmet. The interlocking circumferential cord with metal ring is also used as a drawstring to keep the n mesh formed to the helmet shell. The net has a rip at the upper rear which I believe was caused by the same event which caused a scuff in the paint beneath (This is illustrated in the photos) The chinstrap shows every sign of being original to the helmet. It is a bit stiff and was period cut to remove about an inch of slack. All components of this helmet are matching as far as condition. The entire things is well balanced and honest. Helmets with originaly applied nets come around only once in a blue moon. SOLD

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Item 870 M40 Single decal Luftwaffe helmet

An outstanding helmet all the way around. This Q62 retains nearly 100% of it’s paint and 100% of it’s Luftwaffe decal. I believe that it was never issued as there is no evidence that a chinstrap was ever installed. There is an acceptance stamp faintly visible in the dome which is unusual for Quist helmets. Overall, it’s among the nicest condition helmets I have ever been able to offer. ON HOLD

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Item 869 M40 Single decal Luftwaffe helmet

This is a Q66 single decal Luftwaffe helmet which; like the helmet above, I beliee was never issued. This one shows signs of scuffs on the exterior which is most likely due to post-war conditions; ie; storage/handling. The eagle decal rates at 97% and the paint at 95%. The matte quality is excellent with no darkening and shone caused by collector handling. The liner is in absolutely striking condition. ON HOLD

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Item 868 M18 Imperial German helmet

This is a G62 (made by Gebruder Gnüchtel Lauter, Saxony). It retains 95% of it’s original feldgrau paint. The liner is intact with each of its three pads still connected to the M18 steel liner frame. There is a portion of the original chinstrap remaining. The split-pins show no tampering. Unlike the M35-42 series helmets, I believe that the smaller sizes of the M16-18 series helmets actually have the more attractive shape. But that’s just me. SOLD

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Item 865 M35 Camouflage Luftwaffe helmet

THis one has a very nise appeal to it. It is a Q68 shell which had originally left the factory as a double decal Luftwaffe helmet. It was subsequently painted over in a camouflage pattern that consists mainly of brown/dark tan colors mixed with subtle hues of green/brown. The national color decal must have been removed as there is no trace peeking through. The eagle decal is peeking through quite a bit. In the close-ups you can see how the over-paint has reacted to the lacquer which covered the decal. The camo paint has sort of shrunken away revealing a very clear outline of the underlying eagle decal. Notice how the chinstrap has been put up over the brim with the brown side out. This is not a brown leather Luftwaffe chinstrap. It is a standard wartime black strap that was applied inside out. It makes a very nice contrast to the color of the paint.. Overall this is a well balanced and honest helmet which displays very well. I guarantee you will love it. ON HOLD

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Item 847 Grouping comprised of an M17 Austrian helmet and US M17 helmet

**Captured on the Italian front**

This is a pair of helmets which belonged to Olof Nathanael Norberg; a Swedish-American volunteer with the US army ambulance service on the Italian front. (see below) The Austrian helmet is an M17 size 66 marked *(star) 66 which was produced by Gebruder Bohler of Kapfenberg. The paint remains 95% intact. There is a fragment of a mailing label on the front which just shows a portion of the addressees name “Anderson” (see below). The three pad lining is intact with all three pads affixed to the liner frame. The liner frame itself was produced by the Krupp factory at Berndorf; which supplied a good many of the liners for the Bohler plant. The chinstrap is the typical cloth type with grommets for the adjustment holes. The maker ink-stamp is mostly present and overall the helmet remains in fine condition; just as sent home by Norberg from the Italian-Austrian front.

The group also contains Norberg’s US M1917 helmet which he had camouflaged as a souvenir at some point after the armistice (the US army never authorized camouflage for their helmets but the soldiers very often applied it to their helmets based upon the German design; usually painted on ship-board or just after return to the states. The original period camouflage remains 99% intact. The liner and chinstrap are in excellent condition. Norberg wrote his name and unit on the chinstrap which matches that on the mailing tag which was wired to one of the chinstrap mounts inside the helmet. 

Olof Nathanael Norberg was born on 25 April 1886, in Finsvik, Västernorrland, Sweden. He immigrated to the US and settled in Ishpeming Michigan. When the US joined WW1 he was 31 years old and joined the all-volunteer United States army ambulance service which provided medical transport to Britain, France and Italy. (the most famous volunteer of this service was Ernest Hemingway who served; as Norberg did, on the Italian front). Norberg was with the M.S.T.U. (medical service transport unit) 350 which like every unit of the USAAS was comprised of 45 men, 20 Ford ambulances, 1 Ford touring car, 1 truck, and a kitchen trailer.  Norberg mailed this Austrian helmet home to his fiancée; Edna Anderson, who was living in their future marital home at 503 North 5th street in Ishpeming Michigan. (The last of the photos above is a modern photograph of the house; which is still standing)  He ended up marrying her in 1920 and they remained married until he died in 1978 at the age of 91. This pair of helmets (with the remarkable history included) is priced at $2750.00

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Item 769 M18 Double decal transition Helmet

This is a good example of a very rare helmet; being an M1918 special model known as the ear-cut-out. It was upgraded twice in it’s life. The first time, the M18 liner was re-installed with upgraded split-pins of late 1920s vintage and the M27 chinstrap replaced the original M18 type. Later the helmet over-painted in feldgrau and  early C.A. Pocher Heer insignias applied at the sides. Most likely this last modification occurred in 1934 or 1935. as later re-issued helmets tended t be upgraded with the newly produced M31 liners. This exact helmet was profiled in my first book “Germany combat helmets”; Pages 211-212, published in 2009. $6450.00

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Item 727 M18 Rework single decal army Helmet

This one has stunning paint and an early Methner & Berger army decal with grey detail lines. The wartime steel framed liner shows moderate wear but is fully intact and sound. The chinstrap is an original that has brown dye on it; indicating it was used by the Norwegians in the post-war era (1940s-1960s) and added to this helmet by a collector in recent years.  She makes a lovely example. $985.00

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Below are some links to pages which you might enjoy looking at.

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Formal studio portarait of Oberfeldwebel Johann Schwerdfeger, a pre-war professional soldier, probably created in connection with his award of the Eichenlaub zum Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes (Oak Leaves to the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross), received in 14 May 1944 when he served as a Zugführer (platoon leader) in the 1.Kompanie / I.Bataillon / Jäger-Regiment 228 / 101.Jäger-Division. Schwerdfeger soldiered from 1935 to 1937 in Infanterie-Regiment 84, and in 1939 was transferred to the third company of Infanterie-Regiment 186 of the 73. Infanterie-Division, at the Polish Campaign’s start. In June 1942, after serving in Jägerersatzbataillon 75, Schwerdfeger joined Jäger-Regiment 228 of the 101. Jäger-Division, who fought in the Don Bend, at Rostov, and at Maikop, in the Caucasus, and joined the retreat through the Kuban and the Taman Peninsula. On 17 May 1943 Schwerdfeger was awarded the Ritterkreuz (Knight’s Cross) for his extraordinary bravery in the battlefield. In April 1944, in the breakout from Hube’s Pocket, he was severely wounded, and was awarded the Eichenlaub for his Ritterkreuz; moreover, Sergeant Schwerdfeger also earned two Panzervernichtungsabzeichen (tank destruction badges), meaning that he singlehandedly destroyed two enemy tanks with hand-held weapon. Schwerdfeger was able to recover from his wounds sustained in Hube’s Pocket and served the remainder of the war. He passed away in December 2015. The novel, “The Willing Flesh”, by veteran Willi Heinrich, and the famous World War II movie “Cross of Iron” (based on the novel), is generally recognised as being loosely based on Schwerdfeger’s experiences as an NCO in Jäger-Regiment 228 in the course of that unit’s retreat through the Kuban and Taman Peninsula in the late stages of the war. 

Be sure to click on this link check out my other website dedicated to other kinds of Militaria

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 E-mail address: wii1944@aol.com

Mailing address:

Ken Niewiarowicz
P.O.Box 582
Lapeer, MI 48446