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Original helmets

 

ORIGINAL HELMETS

This page was updated on LEAP DAY: February 29, at 11:00 PM (GMT minus 5 hours)

I also put some new helmets in the “bargain basement”

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Item 969 M40 Camouflage Helmet

This is an NS64 which originally left the factory as a single decal army helmet. I was later camouflaged by the application of a heavily textured three-color pattern. The colors remain vivid with very good contrast. There is a spot of damage on the top of the dome. The liner and strap show moderate use and wear. The helmet is named on both the leather and inside rim “Uffz. Walde”. Overall this is a stunning camouflage helmet which would display well on anybody’s top-shelf. ON HOLD

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Item 968 M35 Double decal Luftwaffe Helmet

This is an ET66 double decal Luftwaffe helmet of late 1938-early 1939 vintage. The smooth texture paint remains 90% intact with minor scratches and wear evenly distributed along the exterior surface. The “Droop-tail” eagle decal remains like-wise 90% intact; as does the national color shield. The liner frame bears a date of 1938 which corresponds to the 4090 steel lot number, dating the shell to late 1938/early 1939. The chinstrap is maker marked and dated 1940. Overall, this is a very decent example of a pre-war Luftwaffe M35. SOLD

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Item 967 M42 Single decal Army Helmet

Here is an ET66 M42 single decal army helmet with a textbook ET pattern eagle decal which remains 95% intact. The helmet’s painted finish shows little wear, with good crisp texture and very good matte quality; not having become shiny by collector handling. The wartime steel framed liner appears to be unworn with only storage wear. At first glance, it appeared to me possible that this liner was replaced into this helmet. If so, the split-pins were reset correctly and very convincingly. (I do not usually photograph split-pin prongs but have done so in this case so you are able to judge for yourself. ) The helmet overall displays very swell and has a very appealing patina. $1150.00

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Item 966 M35 Double decal Police Helmet

This is an ET64 schutzpolizei helmet from ET’s 1939 contract. (I believe that ET received only two large contracts for police helmets; the earlier one being in 1937). The helmet has seen some where and tear. The smooth texture factory finish rates at 85-90%. The decals are in commensurate condition with various scrapes and chips. The liner shows considerable wear and one of the ‘fingers’ is torn near the base. The re-inforced liner frame is dated 1939. All in all, the helmet shows a lot of character and is 100% honest. ON HOLD

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Item 965 M40 Single decal Kriegsmarine Helmet

This Q66 helmet is from F.W.Quist’s single (and fairly short-lived) contract to supply helmets to the navy, which took place in 1940. The decal is an unmistakable layered gold eagle with the expected slightly green-ish detail lines. The textured paint finish rates at 95% however the area around the decal appears to have been cleaned or some effect has taken place there, which I don’t know the cause of. It is not too distracting when the this very good KM decal is taken into account. You can notice in the close-up photos that there is some feldgrau paint around the end-stud of the chinstrap. The helmet is well named by ‘Knigge’. The leather of the liner is in fine shape with moderate wear and no damage. Overall, it’s a good basic example of a Kriegsmarine M40. ON HOLD

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Item 964 M42 single decal Luftwaffe Helmet

A decent example os an NS Luftwaffe M42 in shell size 64. The eagle decal is a good example of the distinctive NS pattern (note how the talons of the eagles foot do not intrude past the exterior lines of the swastika as they appear to do in decals of other manufacturers. The helmets painted finish remains 90% intact. The pigskin leather of the liner shows age and wear with damage to one of the ‘fingers’ The chinstrap has been shortened a bit. NS M42s are less common than any of the other manufacturers. $1050.00

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Item 965 M35 medic Helmet

This is one of the nicest examples of one of the most difficult helmets to find. It started out as an SE66 double decal army helmet produced in early 1940. The helmet was later painted over with white paint and red cross for use as a combat medic. I believe that I can see traces of the army eagle beneath the white paint but I don’t see anything of the national color shield. The inside of the shell retains the original factory applied smooth texture paint. The exterior paint remains 95% intact. The liner is a steel framed type with steel wire bales. I cannot see the date on the outer frame but assume it to be 1940. The chinstrap appears to be; by all indications, original to the helmet. Overall, this is the best example of a medic helmet that I have seen in years. SOLD

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Item 963 M35 double decal Helmet of 1940

This is a fine example of a 1940 transition-period M35. During the first months of 1940 as the new specifications were being introduced, we occasionally see helmets with a mixture of M35 and M40 specs. This example is an EF64 and was factory finished with the newly specified textured felgrau paint, yet the national color decal was still added. The paint rates at 99% while the decals are not far behind at 95-96%. The liner is a `1940 steel framed type with chamfered aluminum chinstrap bales. The chinstrap is well marked and dated 1937 so likely was a replacement; either wartime or post-war, I cannot tell. Overall a very attractive example of a late double decal helmet. SOLD

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Item 962 M35 single decal army Helmet

Call it a single decal helmet or call it a former double decal. Whichever sounds sexier to you. This is an ET64 of mid 1939 vintage which left the factory originally as a double decal army. After the introduction of the new 1940 specifications, the helmet was painted over the exterior with the army decal being painted around. The ET style eagle decal remains 98% and is crystal clear as far as details. The aluminum framed liner is dated 1939. The chinstrap appreas to have been upgraded as it is a post 1940 steel buckle. There is no maker mark or date to be found on it. Overall this is a very clean example of a wartime combat helmet which displays marvelously. SOLD

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Item 961 M40 single decal army Helmet

This helmet has that honest “been there” look that we all know and love. It shows obvious signs of extended wear but no real damage. The wartime textured finish shows even wear yet remain 95% intact. There is a shallow dent near the top of the crown above the decal-side vent. The decal shows evemly dispersed wear along it’s surface but no missing chinks. It has nice patina which matches the helmet all around. The leather of the liner and chinstrap shows that this helmet is a true veteran. The strap is marked/dated 1940. A very good basic example of one of my favorite helmet types. $1650.00

 

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Item 960 M42 single decal army Helmet

Everybody loves a single decal army M42; the quintessential German combat helmet. This one shows a good bit of wear and tear but has not been abused. It is in “well balanced” condition with all components showing the same age and wear inside and out. The shell is an ET66 with the expected ET pattern eagle decal. The 1940 dated chinstrap appears to be original to the helmet which is always a bonus. SOLD

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Item 959 Type 90 Japanese combat Helmet

This is a 1944 dated example of the Type 90 (1930) Japanese army combat helmet.  It retains 95% of it’s original factory applied field drab paint. The iron star is original to the helmet and is firmly affixed to the front. The liner is intact and the front pad has the ink-stamp indicating the 19th year of Showa (1944). The chinstraps are full-length and intact. The helmet has several kanji characters painted near the rim o the inside. The helmet has an original large mesh net made from brown and tan strands of cotton cord with a thicker drawstring cord. I have seen this net multiple times on Japanese helmets although not as common as the type which draws together at the top; it is still, I believe a known Japanese pattern. Overall it makes a fine display. ON HOLD

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Item 958 M1940 army tropical sun Helmet

This is an exciting pith helmet. It was made by the C.Pose service equipment company in Berlin. The C.Pose company was the first to receive contracts for the Army and Kriegsmarine pith helmets even before the first German military advisors were sent to Afrika in the fall of 1940. This helmet has the embossed logo of the C.Pose company on the sweatband as well as a clear marking on the inside of the leather. The size is 57. The canvas shows wear and staining associated with service use in the dessert. The zinc shields are matching and are original to the helmet. (it is a misnomer to call the tombak shields the “early pattern”. They wer eproduced and used in conjunction with the zinc shields all through the time-frame in which pith helmets were produced. the only difference being that the tombak shields cost a little more.) The color of the canvas is a lighter green than is found in later production helmets. The leather trim is also not as green as those found on later pith helmets. All the features of the earliest pith helmets are found on this example. If you were going to have just one pith helmet in your collection, this one should be it. If you already have pith helmets in your collection, this would be an excellent addition. ON HOLD

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Item 957 M16 Imperial German Helmet

This is a rare example of an M16 helmet produced by the famous toy makers Ignaz and Adolf Bing of Nuremberg. The Bing brothers had been world famous for their stamped metal toys and were at the height of their success until the great war shut down their world-wide exports. (the post war years were not kind to the Bing brothers either for by the early thirties they were literally run out of business by the Nazis. Adolf and Ignaz were Jews.) Anyway… the helmet… This example retains it’s orignal liner; intact and sound with all pads firmly attached to the leather frame. The shell size is 64 (Bing only produced a single size of the M16 helmet; and only for about a year, before they shifted their production lines to stamping out mess gear for the army). The maker mark is quite faint. I cannot make out mush; or any of it on the wearer’s left side where it should be.  The paint remains 95% intact and is the particular shade of feldgrau found on all Bing helmets. A very nice example of a rare M16. ON HOLD

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Item 956 M34 fire/police Helmet

Here is one of the finest example I have seen of the M34 lightweight helmet used by municipal fire/Police units as early as 1934. This is one of the early ones. You can see the helmet was repainted, covering the first pattern police decals, composed of the canted swastika and national color shield. A set of second pattern police decals were applied over the top. The helmet retains 99% paint and decals along with the leather neck protector which is in excellent condition. Overall, this one is a screamer. $750.00

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Item 955 M40 single decal army Helmet

This is a decent example of the M40 single decal army helmet with 85% paint and a 90% ET pattern eagle decal. The shell is an ET66 with a 1940 dated steel framed liner. The leather shows moderate wear and remains intact and supple. The chinstrap is an unknown (possibly field made) variant which appears to be original to the helmet. A good basic example. ON HOLD

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Item 954 British MKII Fiber-rim Paratrooper helmet.

This is a 1942 produced British MKII paratrooper helmet with black fiber padding around the rim and 90+ of it’s original factory applied textured paint. The liner is the early type with thick orange foam padding; manufactured by Briggs Motor bodies and marked/dated BMB1942. The chinstrap harness is the late-war style made from tan canvas webbing.  These straps were added to the helmet when it was modified for use by airborne units of the Australian army in the immediate post-war years. The rear of the helmet shows the two empty bolt-holes which used to hold the rear ends of the leather harness. The canvas web strap harness is mounted only at a single point at direct rear so another hole was added for the retaining bolt. I believe that some 5000 of these helmets were acquired from the British army and so modified. The black rubber top pad inside the dome is loose as they were originally simply glued to the inside of the dome but in most cases have come loose over the years. The accompanying camouflage net is of Australian manufacture. Overall this is a fine condition example of a fairly rare helmet. $1250.00

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Item 953 M35 Former double decal Waffen SS Helmet

Here is a 1939 vintage ET64 SS helmet which has had it’s party shield removed to conform to 1940 specifications. The factory paint remains 95% intact. The runic shield is a textbook pre-1940 ET factory example with nice even patina and only a couple of scratches run across it. The liner frame is clearly dated 1939. The chinstrap is a steel buckle type which was likely a wartime replacement as it appears commensurate in condition with the helmet. The helmet is named in bold lettering however it looks like the soldier had a severe case of the hiccups when he was writing it. The last name is unusual and has a good potential for research. Overall, this helmet has an outstanding appearance and it is evident that it saw it’s share of the war yet was not abused. $12,500.00

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Item 989  M35 Double decal SS-VT Helmet, Historically significant

Identified as having been owned by Irmfried Eberl of Treblinka and Auschwitz

This helmet comes from my own collection. It is a very good example of a double decal SS helmet from the first batch of SS VT helmets produced by Quist in 1938. It has a 1938 dated liner frame. The chinstrap; which is certainly original to the helmet, bears the “V.A. SS 1938” marking that was stamped into chinstraps issued with the first Quist contract. (The markings show considerable age/wear but I have made a comparison with a more clear example for those of you who may not be familiar with this extremely rare SS chinstrap marking). The helmet originally left the factory with the standard feldgrau finish applied by Quist to helmets of their Heer and SS contracts. It was subsequently painted black on the exterior as well as the interior skirt and a set of C.A. Pocher after-market decals were applied. The helmet was issued to an SS man as his “second helmet” for the purposes of parade use. Prior to 1939, every member of the SS Verfungungstruppe was issued two helmets; one for field use and one for dress. The helmet was later repainted in a particular shade of feldgrau which has been seen on other SS re-issues. A third set of decals; another pair of C.A.Pocher after-market types were applied over this third coat of paint. It is important to note that I refer to C.A. Pocher decals as “after-market” because at this period of time, Pocher decals were just that; decals intended for after-market application rather than application at a factory. Pocher decals were generally not applied at any of the helmet factories until later when supply issues caused them to be used for a short time by both the ET and the Quist factories. So; in short, this helmet is in it’s third incarnation and in that sense is one of many such early SS-VT helmets which were re-utilized during the war years. You can see in the decal close-up that there are three layers of decals. It remains in a sound and attractive condition with 90% paint and a striking runic shield. The leather shows wear but is overall intact with no damage.  As to it’s attribution to Irmfried Eberl. The helmet bears Eberl’s name twice imprinted on the leather and the dome of the helmet shell. Why is it assumed to be the helmet of this specific Eberl? Note that there are two other names “Albert” and “Messmer”. On the Auschwitz rolls available at the Holocaust memorial website, there is a messmer and several men with the surname Albert. This is the link. After his short but disastrous tenure as commandant of Treblinka, Eberl was transfered to the Auschwitz death camp. It was there after some months that he left the SS altogether (serving the rest of the war with the medical department of the Wehrmacht). He would have turned in his gear, leaving the helmet as garrison property; to be re-issued to later personnel. The fact that the other names are those of men identified in the Auschwitz rolls leaves the attribution of this helmet beyond any reasonable doubt. The appearance of the helmet and it’s multiple re-issues to at least 4 different men is an aspect which is common to most known “camp helmets”.

Eberl had quite a career if you care to look him up. First was his participation with the T4 euthanasia program at Brandenberg followed by his assignment as the first commandant of Treblinka from July/August 1942, where he presided over one of the bloodiest two month periods of a single facility during the entire history of the Holocaust. Some 160,000 people were liquidated under Eberl’s watch, however he apparently was as wretched as an administrator as he was as a person. Upon the first inspection of the camp by head of Operation Reinhard; Christian Wirth, the state of the camp with it’s piles of unburied corpses caused Eberl to be immediately replaced with Franz Stangl. Eberl later served at Auschwitz and returned for a time to the newly reconsituted T4 program at Brandenberg; ending the war with the Wehrmacht medical department. After May, 1945, Eberl returned to his medical practice in Blaubeuren near Ulm. He was apprehended in January 1948 by the American authorities. When he became aware that the Americans had no doubt as to his identity, he hanged himself in his jail cell. Eberl’s helmet was brought to the US by a veteran from Illinois ( who presumably captured it at some location where Auschwwitz personnel were relocated in the west after the camp was abandoned in the face of the Russian advance in January 1945) The veteran died and his family sold the helmet at their garage sale. It ended up in a collection for many years and only recently was researched by Kelly hicks.

A helmet of this nature is not for everyone. It has born witness to depravity unequaled in all of the human experience. But as a historical artifact, it has few equals. The helmet is priced at $29,500

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Below are some links to pages which you might enjoy looking at.

Note: some of the links are broken (or pages wiped out) since I have moved to the new platform. I intend to rebuild and reset the links when I can get around to it. .

 

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Formal studio portarait of Oberfeldwebel Johann Schwerdfeger, a pre-war professional soldier, probably created in connection with his award of the Eichenlaub zum Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes (Oak Leaves to the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross), received in 14 May 1944 when he served as a Zugführer (platoon leader) in the 1.Kompanie / I.Bataillon / Jäger-Regiment 228 / 101.Jäger-Division. Schwerdfeger soldiered from 1935 to 1937 in Infanterie-Regiment 84, and in 1939 was transferred to the third company of Infanterie-Regiment 186 of the 73. Infanterie-Division, at the Polish Campaign’s start. In June 1942, after serving in Jägerersatzbataillon 75, Schwerdfeger joined Jäger-Regiment 228 of the 101. Jäger-Division, who fought in the Don Bend, at Rostov, and at Maikop, in the Caucasus, and joined the retreat through the Kuban and the Taman Peninsula. On 17 May 1943 Schwerdfeger was awarded the Ritterkreuz (Knight’s Cross) for his extraordinary bravery in the battlefield. In April 1944, in the breakout from Hube’s Pocket, he was severely wounded, and was awarded the Eichenlaub for his Ritterkreuz; moreover, Sergeant Schwerdfeger also earned two Panzervernichtungsabzeichen (tank destruction badges), meaning that he singlehandedly destroyed two enemy tanks with hand-held weapon. Schwerdfeger was able to recover from his wounds sustained in Hube’s Pocket and served the remainder of the war. He passed away in December 2015. The novel, “The Willing Flesh”, by veteran Willi Heinrich, and the famous World War II movie “Cross of Iron” (based on the novel), is generally recognised as being loosely based on Schwerdfeger’s experiences as an NCO in Jäger-Regiment 228 in the course of that unit’s retreat through the Kuban and Taman Peninsula in the late stages of the war. 

Be sure to click on this link check out my other website dedicated to other kinds of Militaria

Contact information:

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 E-mail address: wii1944@aol.com

Mailing address:

Ken Niewiarowicz
P.O.Box 582
Lapeer, MI 48446