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Original helmets

   

   

ORIGINAL HELMETS

This page was updated on January 17, 2021. 

 

I would like to introduce a new book available to the helmet collecting community.

German Helmets 1916-1945

by Jan Meland

This is one of best books that I have seen come out in the last 20 years.  Jan Meland is a Norwegian collector/author with a very good eye for German helmets. In the vast majority of cases, his collection is comprised of helmets obtained from primary sources (out of the woodwork) in his country. Jan has a discerning eye for original examples and a particular talent for photographing them to realistically display their features. He has used his eye and his talent to create, edit and publish a work which is quite literally a feast for the eyes; as well as being highly informative and overall; just a very good read. I am showing below a few of the pages to give an idea of how it is laid out and the types of subjects that he covers. The images below are merely shots that I took with my camera of open pages of Jans book. So the mis-alignments are my own and not Jan’s. I highly advise anybody to get a copy of this book while they can. I believe it can be found on Facebook as well as Jan’s own site: www.german-ww2-helmet.com

 

           

 

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Item 793 M35 Double decal Luftwaffe helmet SE68

This is an SE68 M35double decal Luftwaffe helmet os 1935 vintage. The dome acceptance stamp isdated 1939. The aluminum liner frame is dated 1939. The paint rates at 95%. The eagle decal has taken a couple of hits but is still mostly intact. Nice leather and original drawstring but no chinstrap. SOLD

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Item 792 M42 army camouflage Helmet, captured in Italy

This is an ET64 “early” M42 helmet (with a lot number in the 1500 range). The helmet had a decal when it left the factory but I cannot see an outline of it beneath the paint. It is a great “one looker” 3-color spray camouflage helmet which collector’s refer to as a Normandy pattern except that this helmet was Captured in Italy… The helmet has an outstanding camouflage pattern with good contrast and the paint remains 95% intact. The liner shows moderate wear; with all intat leather and it’s original RB numbered chinstrap.  All components are in commensurate condition; making this a very well balanced and honest helmet as well as being one with a good history.  The helmet was captured by a Captain in the 366th regiment (92nd division) from Roanoke, Virginia.  The helmet comes with some of the officer’s paperwork. Although one document relates to customs declaration when he was returning to the US, there is no mention of specific items he is bringing back with him.  Overall; a “top shelf” example. ON HOLD

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Item 791 Splinter pattern Army Helmet cover 

This is a nicely used example of the Wehrmacht reversible splinter pattern camouflage helmet cover. Good colors and very sound with signs of moderate wear. It is shown here displayed on a size 64 M42 which is not included. The cover is textbook in every way. Actually it was photographed in the textbook. This cover was profiled on page 266 of my 2009 book “Germany’s combat helmets” by Roger Bender publishing.  ON HOLD

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Item 790 M35 Double decal army Helmet

This helmet would satisfy even the most discerning of collectors. Made by NS (size 64) in 1939 the original factory paint remains 98% intact with only minor scratches. The color is excellent as is the matte quality; not having been altered by patina or collector handling. The decals have held up remarkably and both are in 98% condition. The eagle being a textbook factory applied C.A. Pocher (the only decal used by NS from 1936 until 1943). The liner frame is dated 1939 and is infested with dust and greebles that we all want to see in an untouched helmet. The acceptance stamp appears to have been applied with a half-dry stamp because only about half of it transferred to the metal of the dome. The chinstrap is an early aluminum mounted type but hard as I try, I cannot make out the manufacture or date marking. Overall, this one is a top-shelf example. ON HOLD

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Item 789 M35 Army/Luftwaffe Helmet

This helmet started out life as a 1938 vintage Double decal Luftwaffe made by SE in shell size 64. Later (presumably after 1940) it underwent gender re-assignment and came back as a single decal army helmet. Subsequent wear to the finish has brought out the national color shield a bit as well as portions of the original Luftwaffe eagle. The wear to the paint appears like very honest service/field wear. The liner frame is dated 1938 and the leather remains intact and sound. One of the more interesting helmets I have run across lately. $800.00

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Item 788 M35 Double decal Lutwaffe Helmet

A strikinghelmet except for the removed swastika. This is an ET68 of 1939 vintage with very good paint. The national color shield has fared much better than the eagle.  The liner frame is dated 1939 and there are excellent markings inside the dome. The chinstrap is a Luftwaffe type but is broken. ON HOLD

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Item 787 M40 Luftwaffe camouflage Helmet

This is a model 40 Luftwaffe helmet (Q62) which is presumably a single decal although the camouflage obscures any sign of it. The helmet was painted over in a two color pattern using what appears to be green vehicle paint and a non-standard yellow/tan color. The net is not a German army issue but rather some sort of civilian type; possibly actually a fish-net. It has formed to the contours of the helmet and has firmed over decades of accumulation of dust and grease elements. The net has every appearance of being period applied to the helmet.  The liner shows moderate use and an original chinstrap is present (maker marked by G.Singer, Klattau 1941) but it is not possible to confirm it’s originality to the helmet. This helmet is featured in Vol.2 of Paul Martin’s notable work on the camouflage helmets of the Third Reich published by B&D publishing. Overall, the helmet is a real stunner and would grace the shelves of the most advanced collection. ON HOLD

 

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Item 786 M42 single decal Luftwaffe helmet

One of the neatest helmets I have ever offered. This is a basic M40 Q64 single decal Luftwaffe helmet that was captured in Normandy by PFC. Walter Smith who was in a rifle company of the 320th infantry regiment of the 35th division. The helmet is a good solid example with 95% original feldblau paint and a textbook Luftwaffe decal. The liner shows light wear and is without damage. An early style M40 type acceptance stamp is visible in the dome. The chinstrap is presumably original to the helmet. There is a mail-home address label on the top addressed to  Ethel Smith of Dunlap Illinois. There is also a frame of cloth tape around the decal. It is theorized that when PFC Smith sent the helmet via the Army post service, he covered the insignia with a card or paper in order to protect it on it’s way back home. That card or paper was later removed but the tape which held it on still remains. Since my father was with a sister regiment (327th) within the 35th division, I am somewhat familiar with where this unit fought around the time that this helmet was acquired. On August 5th (the date written on the inside label) the 320th regiment was pulled from the line and put into division reserve after the crossing of the Vire river south of Torigny-sur-vire. It was at that time that PFC Smith wrote the tags and sent the helmet; presumably after having captured it in the days previous. Mail-home helmets with original labels still intact are quite rare and this is one of the nicest and most complete that I have seen. SOLD

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Item 784 M40 single decal Helmet w/chicken-wire

This is an MS64 single decal army helmet that was painted in a three color camouflage pattern prior to being wrapped in a half basket of large mesh chicken wire. The decal is a textbook C.A.Pocher eagle as applied to all NS army helmets. It was slightly painted over at the time that the camouflage was added. The liner is dry and worn but unquestionably original to the helmet.  This helmet was taken by Harold Sonnenberg who was a member of the 106th marine port maintenance company which landed on Utah beach just after D-Day. Sonnenberg’s job was ferrying prisoners back to the beach. As his son recalls the story his father told him; (a story corroborated by each of his 5 siblings) This helmet was taken from a German prisoner named Fritz and at the time Sonnenberg took it; there were twigs and leaves stuck into the wire. This helmet comes with a written statement from Sonnenberg’s son as well as a copy of a photograph of Harold Sonnenberg holding the helmet. A photo taken some 60 years after the war. There is a comparison photo which shows that this helmet is; beyond doubt, the same that appears in the photo. I have rarely ever had a helmet so well documented from the primary source. It’s a top-shelf camo helmet that you will never have to think twice about. ON HOLD

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Item 775 WW1 British MK 1 First pattern “Rimless” Brodie Helmet

Why does Ken want $750 for a WW1 British camo helmet? This is an original example of the super rare 1st model “Rim-less” Brodie helmet. Patented by  John L. Brodie in London in 1915. The first models were made without the applied rim which was sandwiched over the raw edge of the helmet. This was changed to what became known as the Mk1 sometime in early 1916. This helmet is one of the types produced before the introduction of that applied rim. The condition is outstanding outside as well as inside; with it’s original tar-cloth and netted liner with riveted chinstrap. The helmet was painted over in camouflage paint; copied after the angular patterns used by the Germans on their helmets during the last year of the war. The camouflage paint on this helmet is guaranteed to be original to the period. The vast majority of these first model Rim-less helmets were issued out and used up by the end of the war. Surviving example are extremely rare. This one remains in 100% original condition with no post-period alteration or repair. ON HOLD

 

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Item 771 M16 camouflage Helmet

This helmet has been painted in a three color camouflage pattern with back separation lines. The colors are a bit non-standard and I belie that this may be one of the helmets which were adorned with camouflage for souvenirs on the market during the winter of 1918-1919. The paint is obviously period and appears to have had a coat of lacquer applied over it; causing cracking in the surface. The M16 liner remains only in fragments. The colors remain vibrant. $800.00

 

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Item 769 M18 Double decal transition Helmet

This is a good example of a very rare helmet; being an M1918 special model known as the ear-cut-out. It was upgraded twice in it’s life. The first time, the M18 liner was re-installed with upgraded split-pins of late 1920s vintage and the M27 chinstrap replaced the original M18 type. Later the helmet over-painted in feldgrau and  early C.A. Pocher Heer insignias applied at the sides. Most likely this last modification occurred in 1934 or 1935. as later re-issued helmets tended t be upgraded with the newly produced M31 liners. This exact helmet was profiled in my first book “Germany combat helmets”; Pages 211-212, published in 2009. $6450.00

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Item 764 M16 Helmet

This one is uncommon in this configuration. The tan camouflage paint is certainly of the second war period. It appears that the liner was removed and the helmet was painted both inside and out; the exterior being mixed with fine sand for a rough texture surface. The liner retaining pins are originals but do not have any of this paint on them so I assume they were replaced as probably is the original liner itself. SOLD

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Item 759 M42 single decal army helmet

Here is an EF M42 single decal army with a thin-wing Huber-Jordan-Koerner eagle decal. It is of relatively early production as the maker mark is still located at the side. The eagle decal displays the moderate wear and damage points. The decal has toned just a bit although the paint remains fairly unaltered by darkening caused by patina and collector handling. 98% paint and 95% decal. The leather liner has a bit of a reddish hue to it which should NOT be confused with liners that were dyed red by the Norwegian army for post-war use. I can spot one of those a mile away. This liner is a completely original example (and original to the helmet) which just happens to have a slight red hue to it. There is a repair to the rear tongue. A very nice example of an M42 single decal army helmet. Add a strap and a string and you’ll really have something here $1100.00

 

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Item 756 M18 camouflage helmet helmet

This is a B.F.64 M18 helmet of 1918 production. It was camouflaged in a fairly sloppy manner with no separation lines which had been prescribed by the Ludendorff order of March 1918. The camouflage rates at about 70% intact. The liner pads are weak but are; for the most part, present. $875.00 ON HOLD

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Item 730 M35 Luftwaffe three-color spray “Normandy” camouflage Helmet

This is an ET62 former double decal Luftwaffe helmet which has been sprayed in a three color (standard vehicle colors) pattern over the smooth texture M35 paint.  The camouflage aint remains 90-95% intact. The Luftwaffe eagle decal can faintly been seen in relief but I see no trace of the national color shield which would certainly have been there at one time. The liner bears a 1938 date on the aluminum frame. The chinstrap is from a manufacturer who is known as having Luftwaffe contracts. The strap also bears the “L.B.A.” Luftwaffe property mark. I dislike the term “Normandy Camo” but I am using it here. This is a nice Normandy camo. ON HOLD

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Item 727 M18 Rework single decal army Helmet

This one has stunning paint and an early Methner & Berger army decal with grey detail lines. The wartime steel framed liner shows moderate wear but is fully intact and sound. The chinstrap is an original that has brown dye on it; indicating it was used by the Norwegians in the post-war era (1940s-1960s) and added to this helmet by a collector in recent years.  She makes a lovely example. $985.00

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Item 723 M35 Double decal Luftwaffe Helmet

This is an ET60 helmet with 97% of it’s original paint and the decals rate at about 90%. The finish of the helmet is in great shape with even coloring and little effects of handling wear and patina. The size 53 liner appears nearly unworn. The original drawstring is present. The liner frame is dated 1938. The chinstrap is an original but is likely been replaced onto this helmet. A wonderful example; if a bit on the small size. $2000.00

 

 

Below are some links to pages which you might enjoy looking at.

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Formal studio portarait of Oberfeldwebel Johann Schwerdfeger, a pre-war professional soldier, probably created in connection with his award of the Eichenlaub zum Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes (Oak Leaves to the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross), received in 14 May 1944 when he served as a Zugführer (platoon leader) in the 1.Kompanie / I.Bataillon / Jäger-Regiment 228 / 101.Jäger-Division. Schwerdfeger soldiered from 1935 to 1937 in Infanterie-Regiment 84, and in 1939 was transferred to the third company of Infanterie-Regiment 186 of the 73. Infanterie-Division, at the Polish Campaign’s start. In June 1942, after serving in Jägerersatzbataillon 75, Schwerdfeger joined Jäger-Regiment 228 of the 101. Jäger-Division, who fought in the Don Bend, at Rostov, and at Maikop, in the Caucasus, and joined the retreat through the Kuban and the Taman Peninsula. On 17 May 1943 Schwerdfeger was awarded the Ritterkreuz (Knight’s Cross) for his extraordinary bravery in the battlefield. In April 1944, in the breakout from Hube’s Pocket, he was severely wounded, and was awarded the Eichenlaub for his Ritterkreuz; moreover, Sergeant Schwerdfeger also earned two Panzervernichtungsabzeichen (tank destruction badges), meaning that he singlehandedly destroyed two enemy tanks with hand-held weapon. Schwerdfeger was able to recover from his wounds sustained in Hube’s Pocket and served the remainder of the war. He passed away in December 2015. The novel, “The Willing Flesh”, by veteran Willi Heinrich, and the famous World War II movie “Cross of Iron” (based on the novel), is generally recognised as being loosely based on Schwerdfeger’s experiences as an NCO in Jäger-Regiment 228 in the course of that unit’s retreat through the Kuban and Taman Peninsula in the late stages of the war. 

Be sure to click on this link check out my other website dedicated to other kinds of Militaria

Contact information:

To order or to ask questions:

 E-mail address: wii1944@aol.com

Mailing address:

Ken Niewiarowicz
P.O.Box 582
Lapeer, MI 48446