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Original helmets

   

ORIGINAL HELMETS

This page was updated on November 8, 2022

 

      

   

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Item 932 M35 Army Helmet

This is an ET64 helmet of 1937 vintage which originally left the factory as a double decal army helmet. It was subsequently painted over on the exterior but the interior was left alone and still shows it’s M35 smooth texture feldgrau paint and a 1937 dated aluminum framed liner. The decals were removed prior to the over-paint. The helmet retains 95% of it’s original paint. The liner is intact and sound. The chinstrap is a 1940 dated example but appears to be original to the helmet; being installed prior to 1945. A very good and honest example of a combat helmet. SOLD

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Item 931 M16 camouflage Helmet

This helmet was manufactured by the metal stamping firm of the Bing brothers who were famous for their toys in the pre-war years. After 1914 they went into all kinds of war production. The helmet has a disctinctive long front bill which is unique to the Bing brothers. The helmet is a size 64 shell which is the only size that Bing made. The helmet is marked with GBN for “Gebruder Bing Nurnberg”. It also bears a stenciled “64” which is often seen on these helmets in order to make the size easier to tell. The liner was original a leather framed model (Bing helmets are generally early manufactured and I guess that they stopped making helmets before the specifications changed in the spring of 1917. The helmet has a good amount of it’s period camouflage. It also has an American name painted on the inside rear; presumably the guy who brought it home. SOLD

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Item 930 Japanese army pith Helmet

This Japanese army enlisted man’s pith helmet is in practically unissued condition. It has a name on a tag on the inside which shows it was actually issued but it doesn’;t seem to be worn much. The thin pressed cork body retains perfect shape with no dents or cracks. The canvas is in great shape and it is well marked in several places. SOLD

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Item 929 WW1 MkII British Brodie Helmet

This is a very good example of the standard Brodie helmet worn by British soldiers in the trenches during 1917-1918. It retains 95% of it’s original paint. The liner is lightly worn. It is marked with the red ink-stamp on the inside of the composite liner material. Sound chinstrap. Overall this is a completely honest example. SOLD

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Item 928 US M1917 Helmet

This is a very good example of a US M1917 helmet in unissued condition.  99% original paint. There are a couple of blotches of lighter shade paint which is often seen on these helmets. Presumably there were to cover scratches be3fore it left the factory. The liner is in unworn condition and the chinstrap is sound. SOLD

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Item 927 M40 Luftwaffe no-decal helmet

This is a Q66 Luftwaffe helmet produced after the summer of 1943 when decal application was ceased at the factories. It is in basically unissued condition. SOLD

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Item 924 M35 Kriegsmarine helmet

This is an M35 helmet which was factory finished to m1940 specs with regards to the textured feldgrau finish and single decal. The eagle is a textbook gold KM type used by SE in their 1940 Navy contract. The decal is flaked to some extent which is a common occurrence with this specific insignia. There is no danger of it flaking further. The paint rates at 95%+. Overall a very decent example of a KM helmet which is a tough thing to find these days. $1750.00

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Item 923 M38 Hungarian army helmet

This is one of the rarest production helmets to be encountered. The vast majority of Hungarian M38 army helmets produced during the war were lost across the steppes of Russia where the Hungarian army was destroyed. Most of the ones that survived WW2 were refurbished after the war. This size 64 example retains 90%+ of it’s original brown paint. The liner is the second pattern which came into use during the war years. The chinstrap is original and permanently mounted. The helmet shell is marked with the MAVAG maker mark and the royal Hungarian crest which is only found on M38s produced for the ZHungarian army (not to be confused with the M38 which was made on contract for Finland between 1938-40). A very nice example os a supremely rare helmet. $2750.00

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Item 918 US WW2 helmet liner

This liner bears insignia at both sides indicating use at an army training center. The blue circumferential band around the rim indicates infantry. It is one of the earliest instances of insignia application to helmet liners. The liner is an early Westinghouse with grey anodized “A” washers installed at the rivets which hold the web suspension. The original painted insignia and band rate at 90% overall $250.00

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Item 915 M18 style “droop-bill” SS parade helmet

This is an M18 “style” commercially produced helmet which was used almost exclusively by the SS for their early parade helmets. By that, I mean that although the manufacturer is not known; nearly each and every helmet of this specific shell type has been found to be associated with the SS, either by added insignia or by a name/unit marking somewhere on the helmet. Although significantly less than half of the known examples bear any insignia, I have personally never seen a helmet of this type used by another service branch. The last two photos show this helmet in comparison with one which has been adorned with 1935 era C.A.Pocher decals. As t the helmets condition, the paint remains 90% intact. The liner has been patterned after the military M27 style and is permanently riveted to the shell at three points. The chinstrap is permanently riveted to the leather liner frame at each side. Overall the leather is fragile but reasonably intact. This particular helmet is not named or identified by unit. The below image shows the SD man at left wearing a helmet of this exact type with SS insignia.  $1850.00

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Item 912 M42 former Single decal army helmet

Here is an M42 ET64 with a 2707 lot number indicating likely production in the spring of 1943. The factory applied decal was removed as per specifications set down later that summer. 95% paint and a nicely used liner and strap topped off with it’s original draw cord. Overall a totally honest example. $825.00

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Item 890 M42 late war no-decal helmet

This is a Ckl66 with na 5725 lot number indicating likely production in late 1944. The feldgrau paint has very light (almost un-noticable) texture yet remains with good matte quality; having not been effected by patina and collector handling. The liner date cannot be seen but could very well be dated 1944. The leather shows very late war tanning quality. The chinstrap is maker marked an dated 1940 but appears to be very close in condition to the helmet that it could be originally applied. Overall a very honest and well balanced late war helmet. $775.00                           

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Item 847 Grouping comprised of an M17 Austrian helmet and US M17 helmet

**Captured on the Italian front**

This is a pair of helmets which belonged to Olof Nathanael Norberg; a Swedish-American volunteer with the US army ambulance service on the Italian front. (see below) The Austrian helmet is an M17 size 66 marked *(star) 66 which was produced by Gebruder Bohler of Kapfenberg. The paint remains 95% intact. There is a fragment of a mailing label on the front which just shows a portion of the addressees name “Anderson” (see below). The three pad lining is intact with all three pads affixed to the liner frame. The liner frame itself was produced by the Krupp factory at Berndorf; which supplied a good many of the liners for the Bohler plant. The chinstrap is the typical cloth type with grommets for the adjustment holes. The maker ink-stamp is mostly present and overall the helmet remains in fine condition; just as sent home by Norberg from the Italian-Austrian front.

The group also contains Norberg’s US M1917 helmet which he had camouflaged as a souvenir at some point after the armistice (the US army never authorized camouflage for their helmets but the soldiers very often applied it to their helmets based upon the German design; usually painted on ship-board or just after return to the states. The original period camouflage remains 99% intact. The liner and chinstrap are in excellent condition. Norberg wrote his name and unit on the chinstrap which matches that on the mailing tag which was wired to one of the chinstrap mounts inside the helmet. 

Olof Nathanael Norberg was born on 25 April 1886, in Finsvik, Västernorrland, Sweden. He immigrated to the US and settled in Ishpeming Michigan. When the US joined WW1 he was 31 years old and joined the all-volunteer United States army ambulance service which provided medical transport to Britain, France and Italy. (the most famous volunteer of this service was Ernest Hemingway who served; as Norberg did, on the Italian front). Norberg was with the M.S.T.U. (medical service transport unit) 350 which like every unit of the USAAS was comprised of 45 men, 20 Ford ambulances, 1 Ford touring car, 1 truck, and a kitchen trailer.  Norberg mailed this Austrian helmet home to his fiancée; Edna Anderson, who was living in their future marital home at 503 North 5th street in Ishpeming Michigan. (The last of the photos above is a modern photograph of the house; which is still standing)  He ended up marrying her in 1920 and they remained married until he died in 1978 at the age of 91. This pair of helmets (with the remarkable history included) SOLD

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Below are some links to pages which you might enjoy looking at.

Note: some of the links are broken (or pages wiped out) since I have moved to the new platform. I intend to rebuild and reset the links when I can get around to it. .

 

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Formal studio portarait of Oberfeldwebel Johann Schwerdfeger, a pre-war professional soldier, probably created in connection with his award of the Eichenlaub zum Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes (Oak Leaves to the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross), received in 14 May 1944 when he served as a Zugführer (platoon leader) in the 1.Kompanie / I.Bataillon / Jäger-Regiment 228 / 101.Jäger-Division. Schwerdfeger soldiered from 1935 to 1937 in Infanterie-Regiment 84, and in 1939 was transferred to the third company of Infanterie-Regiment 186 of the 73. Infanterie-Division, at the Polish Campaign’s start. In June 1942, after serving in Jägerersatzbataillon 75, Schwerdfeger joined Jäger-Regiment 228 of the 101. Jäger-Division, who fought in the Don Bend, at Rostov, and at Maikop, in the Caucasus, and joined the retreat through the Kuban and the Taman Peninsula. On 17 May 1943 Schwerdfeger was awarded the Ritterkreuz (Knight’s Cross) for his extraordinary bravery in the battlefield. In April 1944, in the breakout from Hube’s Pocket, he was severely wounded, and was awarded the Eichenlaub for his Ritterkreuz; moreover, Sergeant Schwerdfeger also earned two Panzervernichtungsabzeichen (tank destruction badges), meaning that he singlehandedly destroyed two enemy tanks with hand-held weapon. Schwerdfeger was able to recover from his wounds sustained in Hube’s Pocket and served the remainder of the war. He passed away in December 2015. The novel, “The Willing Flesh”, by veteran Willi Heinrich, and the famous World War II movie “Cross of Iron” (based on the novel), is generally recognised as being loosely based on Schwerdfeger’s experiences as an NCO in Jäger-Regiment 228 in the course of that unit’s retreat through the Kuban and Taman Peninsula in the late stages of the war. 

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 E-mail address: wii1944@aol.com

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Ken Niewiarowicz
P.O.Box 582
Lapeer, MI 48446