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Original helmets

 

ORIGINAL HELMETS

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Item 983 M40 Double decal army Helmet

I think that there are more Unicorns in this world than there are original M40 Double decal army helmets. This one is a “one-looker” by any standard. The helmet is an EF64 produced in the spring of 1940. I have a theory that during this period, the steel lot accountability numbers were in the similar range for manufacturers ET, EF and SE (numbers ranging from around 4800 to 5200). Mind you, it’s just a theory that I have developed from having observed these things over the years and nobody can prove it, but I’ll bet I’m right. Anyway, the most important thing is the originality of paint and decals and we certainly have that. The factory finish is typical for EF M35s and it seems they carried over the usage of that color/texture for a time during the transitory period of 1940. Both paint and decals rate at a strong 95%. The eagle is a perfect example of the only real “House” decal that EF ever used. And they only used it in 1939-1940. Closely resembling the Juttner pattern known as the “ET”, it differs in that there is more contrast between the black background and the silver, slightly metallic eagle. It also lacks the dimple found in the birds far right toe. The liner shows moderate wear and is housed in a steel frame marked by schuberthwerke but try as I might, I cannot make out the date. I assume it is 1940. The chinstrap is maker marked by Sachs & Dusselberg which is itself, a fairly rare maker. Overall, this is a helmet that ticks all the right boxes.  SOLD

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Item 981 M42 Waffen SS Helmet

This is a good example of a late production Waffen SS helmet. It is a Ckl64 shell with an accountability number in the 2800 range which would likely date it to the early summer of 1943.  The factory finish remains about 92% with honest even wear all around. The ever important Runic shield is a textbook ET/Ckl pattern and rates at a strong 90% showing commensurate even wear and light patina. The pigskin liner shows moderate wear, has it’s original drawstring and is housed in a 1943 Schuberthwerk liner frame. The chinstrap has an RB number nearer to the end-stud than the normal position at the tip. Overall this SS M42 has great shelf appeal. SOLD

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Item 979 M35 single (former double) decal army Helmet

This is a late production NS 66 M35 which was factory produced in the spring of 1940. It was subsequently repainted over the exterior surface, covering the national color shield but the Army decal was very carefully/precisely masked off. The decal is a textbook C.A. Pocher which was the only decal that NS ever used for standard applications from 1936 to 1943. The inside of the helmet remains in it’;s original factory configuration with a 1940 type acceptance stamp inside the dome. A circular paper label covers half of the acceptance stamp. The aluminum framed liner is dated 1939. The chinstrap is an early aluminum buckle type and although the date is not discernible, it appears by every indication to be original to the helmet. With the textured paint rating at a good 98%, this helmet has wonderful shelf appeal. SOLD

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Item 980 US M1 Helmet with USMC cover

For those of you who read my descriptions on helmets, perhaps you will agree that I do not make a habit of using flowery adjectives. But I am really tempted to here. This is by far the most original and honest appearing USMC helmets that I have ever had. Although I wasn’t there when the cover was applied to this helmet, I am completely convinced that they have been together since pre-1945. This set has been in my collection since I bought it about 20 years ago at a Kansas city militaria show. The helmet is a very early fixed-bale (with a steel heat-treat number of 38A) it remains in its original factory applied texture and color with excellent matte quality because it has spent  it’s entire life parked under this cover. There is some light surface rust but it wasn’t extensive enough to bleed into the cover as only the faintest bit of rust shows on the cover. The cover retains very good color although it is a bit faded as you can see in the photo of the inside of the helmet without the liner.  There is a bit of wear at the front rim as yo can see in the photos. Overall, there is just enough wear and fading to give it that “Been-there” look to it. The cover is the second-pattern type which eliminated the slits that previously were added to the covers in order to apply foliage. These second pattern covers made their first major appearance in the 1944 battles of Saipan and Peleliu at which time the United states Marine Corps was fielding six divisions.  There is no Eagle/Globe/Anchor emblem applied to the helmet because it apparently left government possession after 1945. (all remaining government stocks of USMC helmet covers had the emblem stamped onto the front.) See the photo where the cover is standing on it’s own in between the shell and the liner. It has been applied to this helmet so long, it has taken on the form of the helmet shell. The helmet liner shows moderate wear to the webbing. It has green anodized “A” washers and is maker marked inside the dome along with a number “4”. The exterior of the liner has been period painted and has the frontal insignia of a Marie Corporal.  The helmet and cover are not named or identified. Anyway.. enough said. The pictures tell the rest; showing one of the most honest and attractive WW2 USMC helmets that you are likely to find. SOLD

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Item 977 M42 Single decal Luftwaffe Helmet

This is an NS M42 Luftwaffe helmet. Immediately recognizable by the distinct pattern decal that differs from the other standard Luftwaffe types whereas the eagle’s foot does not intrude past the detail line of the upper leg of the swastika. This decal pattern is found only on NS Luftwaffe helmets. The decal rates at 95% as does the factory applied blue-gray textured paint. The wartime steel-framed liner shows moderate wear and remains completely intact. The chinstrap is an odd appearing type and may well be a replaced early Bundeswehr strap. In any case, the condition is not commensurate with the leather of the liner show it should be considered a replacement. Regardless, the helmet displays well at all angles and is a good example of a fairly rare (NS) Luftwaffe M42. SOLD

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Item 976 M42 No-decal army Helmet

This is a very clean example of the standard M42 no-decal which became general issue after the summer of 1943. (there are even those who subscribe to the theory that these feldgrau painted helmets were to be issued to Luftwaffe troops late in the war; as sort of an Einheitshelm or universal pattern). The shell is a size 66 manufactured by Hkp at the Emaillerwerke fabrik in Lauter, Saxony. ( a bit of interesting trivia for you fellow helmet-nerds: the Lauter plant is still standing and still in business producing stamped metal roofing material). This helmet retains 98% of it’s feldgrau paint and it has a liner which is still nicely supple and light tan in color. The chinstrap is a reproduction which was added by a former owner. I’ll let the next owner decide what to do with it. SOLD

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Item 974 M35 Double decal army Helmet

An example from the first month production; 1935

This is a fine example of an M35 helmet made during the first weeks of production. It is a size 64 shell produced by ET in late 1935 (at this point in time, ET was the only manufacturer of the M35) The original smooth texture paint is the correct shade and paint thickness seen in the earliest ETs. The paint rates at 97%. The decals are first pattern Juttner types as would be seen with little variation on ET production through-out the next 8 years. The helmet has a Schuberthwerk liner with maker mark and 1935 date on the frame. The leather bears a die-stamped size marking (which was changed to an inkstamp in early 1936) The dome of the helmet shows a 1935 ET acceptance stamp. These early stamps are known for their slightly smaller size. The steel lot accountability number is 2731 which further illustrates the early production of the shell. The chinstrap is a Rahm-Kampmann dated 1936. (to the best of my knowledge, there is no M31 chinstrap dated 1935. The earliest helmets will be found with either a 1936 dated M31 or an earlier dated M27 carbine-hook strap.) Overall, this is an excellent example of a very rare M35. SOLD

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Item 975 US M1 Helmet, Identified 2nd division

This is a standard US M1 fixed bale helmet. It is in fine condition with 99% of it’s original textured paint. It was period adorned with a US Second infantry division insignia at the front along with a Major oakleaf. A white “follow-me” tactical bar was painted at the rear. The inside is named to Capt. Chauncy harris O-348773. The liner is an early Inland manufactured (counter marked by Firestone) with green “A” washers. Chauncy Harris commanded a company of the 38th regiment when the 2nd Division landed at Omaha beach, June 7, 1944. By the Battle of the Bulge, as a major, he was the second battalion executive officer. The helmet was obtained recently from Harris’ daughter. It is an exceedingly rare example of a helmet actually kept and returned home by the veteran who wore it during the war. Given it’s fine state of preservation and originality, It is a “top-shelf” helmet by any standard. SOLD

 

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Below are some links to pages which you might enjoy looking at.

Note: some of the links are broken (or pages wiped out) since I have moved to the new platform. I intend to rebuild and reset the links when I can get around to it. .

 

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Formal studio portarait of Oberfeldwebel Johann Schwerdfeger, a pre-war professional soldier, probably created in connection with his award of the Eichenlaub zum Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes (Oak Leaves to the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross), received in 14 May 1944 when he served as a Zugführer (platoon leader) in the 1.Kompanie / I.Bataillon / Jäger-Regiment 228 / 101.Jäger-Division. Schwerdfeger soldiered from 1935 to 1937 in Infanterie-Regiment 84, and in 1939 was transferred to the third company of Infanterie-Regiment 186 of the 73. Infanterie-Division, at the Polish Campaign’s start. In June 1942, after serving in Jägerersatzbataillon 75, Schwerdfeger joined Jäger-Regiment 228 of the 101. Jäger-Division, who fought in the Don Bend, at Rostov, and at Maikop, in the Caucasus, and joined the retreat through the Kuban and the Taman Peninsula. On 17 May 1943 Schwerdfeger was awarded the Ritterkreuz (Knight’s Cross) for his extraordinary bravery in the battlefield. In April 1944, in the breakout from Hube’s Pocket, he was severely wounded, and was awarded the Eichenlaub for his Ritterkreuz; moreover, Sergeant Schwerdfeger also earned two Panzervernichtungsabzeichen (tank destruction badges), meaning that he singlehandedly destroyed two enemy tanks with hand-held weapon. Schwerdfeger was able to recover from his wounds sustained in Hube’s Pocket and served the remainder of the war. He passed away in December 2015. The novel, “The Willing Flesh”, by veteran Willi Heinrich, and the famous World War II movie “Cross of Iron” (based on the novel), is generally recognised as being loosely based on Schwerdfeger’s experiences as an NCO in Jäger-Regiment 228 in the course of that unit’s retreat through the Kuban and Taman Peninsula in the late stages of the war. 

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 E-mail address: wii1944@aol.com

Mailing address:

Ken Niewiarowicz
P.O.Box 582
Lapeer, MI 48446