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Original helmets

   

ORIGINAL HELMETS

This website was updated on August 7, 2022 

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Item 908 U.S. M1 Fixed bale helmet

This is basically a mint/unissued US M1 fixed-bale helmet. It bears a lot number 596C which most likely indicates the helmet having been pressed from Mid 1942 to Mid 1943. (sorry I cannot narrow it down more but information on US helmet lot numbers is rather fragmentary). The liner is an early Westinghouse with grey/green “A” washers. All components appear unworn/unused. ON HOLD

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Item 907 M35 Double decal Luftwaffe helmet

This helmet has a screamer finish to it. The luftwaffe feldblau is 98% intact and still retains it’s matte quality; not being effected by patina and handling wear. The shell is a Q68 with a clean and almost unworn size 60 liner. The chinstrap is an unmarked wartime original which; quite honestly, could have been installed to this helmet any time. But is in itself, an original strap. The eagle decal has a smudge on the right wing which looks like it could have occurred at the factory. Just look at that national color shield. It has a marvelous appearance with a very clear lacquer line. There is no acceptance stamp inside the dome which is a common thing among Q M35 helmets. Overall this one is a beauty from all angles. SOLD

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Item 906 M35 Snow camouflage helmet

This is an SE68 which originally left the factory as a double decal Luftwaffe helmet. The decals were removed at some point prior to the application of a brush-painted white coat during the December 1944 Ardennes offensive. We know this because the helmet was acquired in Europe from the son of the German veteran himself. ( I am sorry but no information regarding name or unit is able to be passed on). The helmet retains 85-90% of it’s white over-paint. The leather liner and strap show moderate wear but are completely intact and sound. The appearance of the white exterior is classic and in my opinion is a “one looker” original; making it a true rarity in a world where the majority of winter camouflage helmets are fake. I originally bought this helmet for my own collection and it graced my shelves for a while before being replaced by another. SOLD

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Item 905 M40 Single decal Luftwaffe helmet

This is an M40 single decal helmet and oh what a decal it is! Almost literally 100% intact; this Luftwaffe eagle sits happily atop a painted finish which remains 97% intact with only a few scuffs and excellent matte quality.  The liner appears unworn. There is no chinstrap and may indeed never have had one installed (Helmets; as you know, left the factory and were issued without attached chinstraps). If you have been searching for an unissued Luftwaffe helmet, you might want to consider this one. SOLD

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Item 904 M35 Double decal Luftwaffe helmet

This is a good and basic example of the lesser common “snake leg” version of the first pattern Luftwaffe eagle. The ET 64 shell retains about 80% of it’s original paint and decals. It has a 1938 dated liner and an original late wartime chinstrap which was most likely installed some time in recent years. $1595.00

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Item 901 M35  Army helmet

This helmet appears to have had a long service life. It is an EF64 and was originally issued as a double decal army helmet. The chinstrap is maker marked/dated 1940 but appears by all indications to be original to the helmet; meaning that it was changed during the war; no doubt after having seen use enough that the original issued strap was worn enough to require changing. The helmet was painted over after 1940 and the decal was painted around. You can see the ridge line around the decal. Then some time after the helmet was painted again; this time covering the decal or at least the area where the decal had been until being removed. The chronology is unclear but it remains that the helmet was refurbished several times prior to May 1945. The liner is the original factory installed aluminum framed one. The helmet shows good evidence of wear after it’s final paint job with the early nickel alloy split-pins being nearly bare. If you like helmets that can tell a story, then you may want to consider this one. SOLD

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Item 899 M35 over-painted Army helmet

This is an 1937 EF62 former Double decal army helmet that was painted over during the war years to conform with  post 1940 specifications. You cn see the original factory finish paint in areas where the over-paint is damaged or worn. The decal is an August Juttner type which was one f three different decals used by EF in the early years of production. You can see where the decal was painted around. The helmet shows even wear on all components and retains a nice honest look. SOLD

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Item 899 M1940 Luftwaffe Pith helmet

One of the more difficult to find Pith helmets. This is a very nice example of the M40 pith helmet manufactured issue to the Luftwaffe The pressed cork body is intact with no crunched or dented spots. The canvas is in very decent shape; showing only signs of honest field wear and no storage damage. size marked on the inside sweat band. The brass inner frame of the air-vent is un-marked. The helmet is trimmed in brown leather and the Luftwaffe service branch shields are wartime zinc and aluminum with sound original prongs. The size is 56. SOLD

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Item 898 M1940 Army canvas pith helmet

This is a very nice example of the M40 pith helmet manufactured in 1942. The pressed cork body is intact with no crunched or dented spots. The canvas is in very decent shape; showing only signs of honest field wear and no storage damage. Maker/size marked on the inside sweat band. The brass inner frame of the air-vent is un-marked. The helmet is trimmed in green leather and the Army service branch shields have sound original prongs. The size is 57. SOLD

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Item 896 German tropical Felt sun helmet

This is an example of the M40 pith helmet manufactured in pressed felt The body is intact with no crunched or dented spots; with the exception of a flat appearance to the top of the dome. However this shape seems typical of this maker so may actually be part of the design. The helmet appears to be in near un-issued condition with little or no storage wear. It is size marked on the inside sweat band. The zinc inner frame of the air-vent is un-marked. The helmet is trimmed in immaculate green leather and the Army service branch shields are wartime zinc and aluminum with sound original prongs. The size is 57. SOLD

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Item 890 M42 late war no-decal helmet

This is a Ckl66 with na 5725 lot number indicating likely production in late 1944. The feldgrau paint has very light (almost un-noticable) texture yet remains with good matte quality; having not been effected by patina and collector handling. The liner date cannot be seen but could very well be dated 1944. The leather shows very late war tanning quality. The chinstrap is maker marked an dated 1940 but appears to be very close in condition to the helmet that it could be originally applied. Overall a very honest and well balanced late war helmet. $775.00

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Item 894 M35 Double decal Police helmet

This is a striking example of an M35 police helmet from the NS 1938 contract. The paint remains 98% intact. The decals rate likewise with the exception of the party shield which appears (most likely) to have taken a strike against another helmet at the factory and smudged the decal. The liner shows moderate wear which in comparison to the very clean exterior, makes me think that the original wearer did a lot of standing around rather than spending his service time in an environment where a lot of scratches and dings would occur. The acceptance stamp is clearly visible and is 1938 dated. The liner frame is made by Schuberthwerk and is 1938 dated. The chinstrap is a Franz Brehme and is likewise dated 1938. Overall, a top shelf example. ON HOLD

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Item 894 M40 single decal Waffen SS helmet

Here is an ET64 single decal SS helmet which is among the top 5 which I have ever owned as far as condition. The ET runic shield remains 99% intact while the paint remains likewise 99%. The color and matte quality are not effected by wear or collector handling. The liner is a nice and evenly colored tan leather which remains supple with little sign of wear. The strap is; by all indications, original to the helmet. Overall this one is a real gem SOLD

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Item 889 M35 Early Quist helmet; over-painted.

This helmet was likely produced during the first year of Quist production. The underlying factory paint is the semi-gloss type feldgrau which Quist used in their earliest helmets. Note that the Q letter is in gothic script which was changed to the secod style font in late 36/early 37. The exterior has been overpainted in wartime feldgrau paint and there is no sign of the decals beneath the paint. They could have been removed prior to being repainted. The 1937 dated aluminum non-reinforced liner has a maker mark which does not include the D.R.P. marking. Schuberthwerke of Braunschweig was the patent holder of the M31 liner system. In early 1937, after other manufacturers began producing the M31 liner, Schuberthwerk began adding the D.R.P. marking to indicate that they were the patent holder.  This liner without the D.R.P must be quite early. The chinstrap appears original to the helmet but I cannot make out the date. Overall a helmet with the appearance of a long service life. SOLD

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Item 859 M35 double decal Luftwaffe helmet

Here is an SE68 Double decal Luftwaffe helmet with a 61 sized liner. The helmet has a light shade of Luftwaffe blue/grey. The exterior has taken a couple of scuffs which are evident on the upper part of the dome. The eagle decal is the “dot-less” version of the ET/Q style which was most prevalently seen in late 1939 through 1940. The eagle decal shows a defined laquer line while the national color shield shows none. The massive 61 sized liner shows very little wear and is contained in a 1939 dated aluminum liner frame. The 45xx lot number indicates late 1939 production. The chinstrap is L.B.A. marked but I cannot make out the date at the tip. SOLD

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Item 871 M1940 Luftwaffe pith helmet

One of the rarest Pith helmets you are going to encounter. This is a first-year produced example of the M40 pith helmet manufactured by the premier sun-helmet maker; C.Pose equipment company of Berlin in 1940. Honestly for all I know, this could be the first pith helmet that the Germans made. The pressed cork body is intact with no crunched or dented spots. The canvas is in very decent shape; showing only signs of honest field wear and no storage damage. Well marked on the inside sweat band and embossed on the outer side of the leather. The brass inner frame of the air-vent is marked with the C.Pose company name. The helmet is trimmed in brown leather and the Luftwaffe service branch shields are early tombak types with sound original prongs. The size is 57. SOLD                               

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Item 847 Grouping comprised of an M17 Austrian helmet and US M17 helmet

**Captured on the Italian front**

This is a pair of helmets which belonged to Olof Nathanael Norberg; a Swedish-American volunteer with the US army ambulance service on the Italian front. (see below) The Austrian helmet is an M17 size 66 marked *(star) 66 which was produced by Gebruder Bohler of Kapfenberg. The paint remains 95% intact. There is a fragment of a mailing label on the front which just shows a portion of the addressees name “Anderson” (see below). The three pad lining is intact with all three pads affixed to the liner frame. The liner frame itself was produced by the Krupp factory at Berndorf; which supplied a good many of the liners for the Bohler plant. The chinstrap is the typical cloth type with grommets for the adjustment holes. The maker ink-stamp is mostly present and overall the helmet remains in fine condition; just as sent home by Norberg from the Italian-Austrian front.

The group also contains Norberg’s US M1917 helmet which he had camouflaged as a souvenir at some point after the armistice (the US army never authorized camouflage for their helmets but the soldiers very often applied it to their helmets based upon the German design; usually painted on ship-board or just after return to the states. The original period camouflage remains 99% intact. The liner and chinstrap are in excellent condition. Norberg wrote his name and unit on the chinstrap which matches that on the mailing tag which was wired to one of the chinstrap mounts inside the helmet. 

Olof Nathanael Norberg was born on 25 April 1886, in Finsvik, Västernorrland, Sweden. He immigrated to the US and settled in Ishpeming Michigan. When the US joined WW1 he was 31 years old and joined the all-volunteer United States army ambulance service which provided medical transport to Britain, France and Italy. (the most famous volunteer of this service was Ernest Hemingway who served; as Norberg did, on the Italian front). Norberg was with the M.S.T.U. (medical service transport unit) 350 which like every unit of the USAAS was comprised of 45 men, 20 Ford ambulances, 1 Ford touring car, 1 truck, and a kitchen trailer.  Norberg mailed this Austrian helmet home to his fiancée; Edna Anderson, who was living in their future marital home at 503 North 5th street in Ishpeming Michigan. (The last of the photos above is a modern photograph of the house; which is still standing)  He ended up marrying her in 1920 and they remained married until he died in 1978 at the age of 91. This pair of helmets (with the remarkable history included) is priced at $2450.00

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Below are some links to pages which you might enjoy looking at.

Note: some of the links are broken (or pages wiped out) since I have moved to the new platform. I intend to rebuild and reset the links when I can get around to it. .

 

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Formal studio portarait of Oberfeldwebel Johann Schwerdfeger, a pre-war professional soldier, probably created in connection with his award of the Eichenlaub zum Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes (Oak Leaves to the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross), received in 14 May 1944 when he served as a Zugführer (platoon leader) in the 1.Kompanie / I.Bataillon / Jäger-Regiment 228 / 101.Jäger-Division. Schwerdfeger soldiered from 1935 to 1937 in Infanterie-Regiment 84, and in 1939 was transferred to the third company of Infanterie-Regiment 186 of the 73. Infanterie-Division, at the Polish Campaign’s start. In June 1942, after serving in Jägerersatzbataillon 75, Schwerdfeger joined Jäger-Regiment 228 of the 101. Jäger-Division, who fought in the Don Bend, at Rostov, and at Maikop, in the Caucasus, and joined the retreat through the Kuban and the Taman Peninsula. On 17 May 1943 Schwerdfeger was awarded the Ritterkreuz (Knight’s Cross) for his extraordinary bravery in the battlefield. In April 1944, in the breakout from Hube’s Pocket, he was severely wounded, and was awarded the Eichenlaub for his Ritterkreuz; moreover, Sergeant Schwerdfeger also earned two Panzervernichtungsabzeichen (tank destruction badges), meaning that he singlehandedly destroyed two enemy tanks with hand-held weapon. Schwerdfeger was able to recover from his wounds sustained in Hube’s Pocket and served the remainder of the war. He passed away in December 2015. The novel, “The Willing Flesh”, by veteran Willi Heinrich, and the famous World War II movie “Cross of Iron” (based on the novel), is generally recognised as being loosely based on Schwerdfeger’s experiences as an NCO in Jäger-Regiment 228 in the course of that unit’s retreat through the Kuban and Taman Peninsula in the late stages of the war. 

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Contact information:

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 E-mail address: wii1944@aol.com

Mailing address:

Ken Niewiarowicz
P.O.Box 582
Lapeer, MI 48446