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Original helmets

   

ORIGINAL HELMETS

Updated on Sunday June 6, 2021

 

The above 4 helmets are just for show (Today being D-Day and all…)

They are the 4 helmets in my collection that are known to have been in Normandy on D-day, june 6 1944.

From left to right; HQ/508th PIR…  G/327 glider… 116th Inf rgt… 6th FJ regt 

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My thought for today is this:  2012, the Department of Homeland Security published a solicitation for bids on new rifles, which were to have “select fire” capability. For the layman, think machine gun. The solicitation was titled “Personal Defense Weapons.” Apparently, a citizen’s semi-automatic rifle is an assault weapon, but the government’s fully automatic rifle is a personal defense weapon. This seems a bit incongruous.

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Item 846 M35 Single decal Kriegsmarine helmet

This is a TOP SHELF example of a KM helmet from the SE contract of 1940. This contract was composed seemingly entirely of model 35 helmets finished off to 1940 specifications and the vast majority of examples are seen in the 4700m lot number range. (this one is 4789). The textured felgrau paint of this helmet remains 99% intact. The decal is a layered KM type (the layering is quite difficult to see; the decal being applied over textured paint but you can see hints of it, particularly around the legs of the swastika) The liner is nearly immaculate. I cannot claim that this helmet is a combat veteran but it will put any other KM single decal helmet to shame. SOLD

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Item 845 M35 Single decal Kriegsmarine helmet

One of the most honest and well balanced helmets that I have seen. This a KM helmet from the SE contract of 1940. This contract was composed seemingly entirely of model 35 helmets finished off to 1940 specifications and the vast majority of examples are seen in the 4700m lot number range. (this one is 4737). The textured felgrau paint shows some evenly distributed wear and scuffs but remains 95% intact. The decal appears surprisingly NOT a KM decal but rather a standard ET Heer style as found on all SE helmets. This is the only example of this which I have ever seen. Until this helmet crossed my path, each and every SE helmet of this type (M35 SD finished to 1940 specs) has always had a KM eagle on it.  The liner is the thing that distinguishes the helmet as a KM, regardless of insignia. It bears the name and Naval stammrolle number og G. Seltitz; N= North sea fleet; 5276 = master role number; 39 = year he joined and T= fleet service career XIII. The chinstrap is made by G.Scheile which is a known contractor for supplying leather goods to the Kriegsmarine. So; the decal aside, this helmet is about as KM as they come. The chinstrap has a leather split at one side of the buckle axis. But it’s no effect to the display-ability of this fine piece SOLD

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Item 844 M35 Single decal army helmet

This is a super clean Single decal army helmet issued to a clerk by the name of Griesbach. One can imagine the helmet sat on an ammo crate next to Greisbach’s typewriter while the allies were storming the beaches. The helmet started out life probably in 1936 judging by the lot number. After 1940 it was stripped and repainted at some facility which would have had the necessary equipment and stocks of replacement parts. I stop short of calling this a “factory re-issue” because honestly; none of us will ever know where helmets like this were refurbished. If they were indeed sent back to the factories (which would have had the facilities and the parts), then I’d guess this one to have been over-hauled at the ET plant.  The decal is an ET/August Juttner example that stands out as far as condition. The paint remains 98% intact showing only slight and evenly distributed scuffing to the paint. The matte quality of the paint is excellent; showing very little effects of patina and collector handling. The liner appears almost unworn. The 1941 dated pigskin chinstrap is by all indications; original to the helmet and is in commensurate condition. Overall a helmet which has a perfect balance between honesty and condition. It’s one to love. SOLD

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Item 843 M1940 Kriegsmarine pith helmet shields

Here is a 100% original (and very difficult to find) matching set of Kriegsmarine pith helmet sheilds manufactured by Gustav Brehmer in 1941; just as things were starting to heat-up in North Afrika. As you know; the national color shield has to be this type rather than the pointed bottom angle bevel-edged types as used with Heer and Luftwaffe helmets. Textbook, unworn, unapplied and well marked. SOLD

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Item 843 M42 Single decal Waffen SS helmet

This is an EF66 M42 Waffen SS helmet with a very good example of the textbook EF ‘house’ decal as used for all EF factory applications from about 1942 onwards. The Runic shield remains 90% intact. The paint likewise rates at about 90%. The leather liner shows a good mount of wear which is commensurate with the appearance to the helmet in general. The chinstrap is; by all indications, original to the helmet. It shows the effects of having been stretched up over the visor of the helmet for decades. The helmet is nicely named at the rear with bold hand painted lettering. Overall this helmet has a very honest appearance. It brings to mind a helmet captured in the Ardennes after having been worn daily since Normandy.  (I am just citing that as an example. The helmet itself has no real history; having come from another collection). SOLD

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Item 842 Polish MKII helmet

This is a British MkII helmet which was issued to a member of a Polish division serving with the British in Italy. The name of the fellow is no longer known but the helmet itself is everything that it is supposed to be. The paint, liner and strap are all standard for the British MkII. The Polish eagle stenciled on the front is the only feature that makes this helmet what it is; a quite rare example which is one of only a very few which I have ever seen that I believe to be 100% original. SOLD

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Item 841 M1 US fixed bale with Hawley liner

This is a fixed bale M! helmet with 98% original paint and intact cloth chinstraps. The iner is a first pattern Hawley fiber type with white rayon lining. The shell f the liner is intact with no dents or malformations. It was painted over in standard 3407 O.D. vehicle paint. The liner have; I believe, always been together. The condition of each is commensurate with the other and it comes from a very old collection. ON HOLD

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Item 840 M35 Double decal army Helmet

Here is an NS66 double decal army helmet. I believe it to be of 1939 vintage judging by the lot number and the dated (broken) chinstrap which I believe is likely original to the helet The paint is 85% intact. The army eagle decal is a standard C.A.Pocher as used by NS for factory applications from 1936-1943. The national color shield has taken some whacks but overall the helmet is well balanced with evenly distributed wear. It will make a fairly good example at a price which won’t break the bank. ON HOLD

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Item 839 M16 Camouflage Helmet

This is a Q66 with 80% of it’s original camouflage paint being a three color pattern with the standard black separation lines.  The liner pads show a good amount fo wear and age but remain affixed to the steel liner frame. The two chinstrap buckle remain connected. The rear split-pin has been replaced with an original thick-head type. SOLD

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Item 838 M42 No-decal army Helmet

This is a great example of a late war rear marked NS64 no decal helmet. 95%+ original paint. Intact liner and the chinstrap (unmarked) appears by all indications to be original to the helmet. Overall it is among the most honest appearing and “well balanced” helmets which I have ever been able to offer. You’ll love it. SOLD

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Item 836 M35 Double decal army Helmet

Here is an M35 double decal army helmet produced within the first few months of production By all that is known or surmised, helmets produced for the first Heer contract most likely appeared in November or December of 1935. The earliest steel lot number which I have observed is 2707. Several helmets with lot numbers in the 2700 range have had components and acceptance stamps dated 1935. This helmet bears a 1936 dated acceptance stamp in the dome as well as a 1936 dated liner frame. I would place it’s likely production time-frame as January/February 1936. The shell shape of the helmet is a bit more round at the dome. This is a feature which changes in early/mid 1936. The feldgrau paint is the lightest shade which I have seen and again; appears on helmets until early/mid 1936. The eagle decal is an example of the August Juttner type which became standardized at the ET house decal from 1936 until the end of decal application. (some extreme early examples appear with the wilhelm Abels design eagle decal but that appears to disappear by early 1936)The painted finish of this helmet remains 97% intact. There are traces of a stacking ring imprint in the paint near the top of the dome. (presumably caused by stacking freshly painted shells at the factory) The decal both rate at 97-99%. The liner is the expected non-reinforced aluminum frame type with leather that is die-marked for size and date. (another feature which is changed by early/mid 1936) The manufactur date on the outside of the frame is difficult to read unless one cleans away the dust accumulation; which I am not willing to do. The dome acceptance stamp is fairly clear. The chinstrap is a product of the Gustave Reinhardt lederfabrik of Berlin; one of the first companies to produce the M31 chinstrap. The leather of the liner is intact and sound. It leans toward being a bit dry but is fully pliable. The ET64 maker/size mark is a bit obscured by the thick paint application (which is another feature of extreme early helmets). Overall this is a striking example of one of the earliest M35 army helmets. ON HOLD

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Item 833 M40 Kriegsmarine Camouflage Helmet

TYou have probably never seen a KM decal as clearly and striking as this one is. The helmet is an mid-1940 produced M40 with a 3 digit lot number. (just after ET switched to it’s second series of lot numbers) The decal is textbook and unmistakable in every way as a layered KM insignia. The helmet was camouflaged by brush with 1942 spec ordnance tan applied in light dabs. The liner assembly of this helmet has been replaced. The liner itself is correct and original. The split-pins do not show signs of tampering. It is likely that you would not be able to tell otherwise that the liner has been replaced. Overall this is a striking piece with great self appeal. We all know that KM camouflage helmets are as rare as hen’s teeth. ON HOLD

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Item 831 M40 Single decal Luftwaffe Helmet

This is a Q64 whch is basically un-issued. Any damage such as scuffs and such is from storage. The paint remains 98% intact and has a very good matte appearance; not being effected by collector handling and patina. The Luftwaffe eagle decal is a real beauty and is almost 100% intact. The liner shows no wear. There is no chinstrap and I believe that one was never installed. (helmets were issued without chinstraps and the soldier had to install one himself) $1375.00

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Item 830 M40 single decal army Helmet

Here is an EF64 M40 single decal army helmet with 85-90% paint and 75% decal. The decal has even wear and has lost detail but is honest and in commensurate condition with the paint and the reat of the helmet. The rear split-pin is missing. This helmet has a strange 2-digit lot number (But then again; a lot of EF lot numbers are strange) Find a rear split-pin to complete it (if you wish) and you would have a very nice basic example here. ON HOLD

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Item 829 M38 Fallschirmjager Helmet

This is an ET68 M38 paratrooper helmet that has seen action but not abused. The factory painted finish remains 90% intact. The liner has moderate wear/damage and has been marked with the wearer’s initials and some other information at the rear. The Karl Heisler hersteller markings are clearly seen. The chinstrap harness is complete and intact although the fine grade leather has become just a bit dry; a common problem seen with these intricate and special designed straps. The straps are sound enough for normal handling and display. The bolts each are double nutted; retaining both inner and outer nuts. The maker mark on the shell is either stamped too high (so as to be obscured by the liner frame) or stamped to weakly to be seen. I cannot see anything readable. The shell is; however 100% original. This one is a very good example of a combat used helmet which was produced (judging by the fact there is no decal) after the summer/fall of 1943.  ON HOLD

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Item 828 M35 Single decal army Helmet

Here is an EF 64 which has been over-painted for re-issue. The eagle is a very good example of an ET style re-issue decal and remains 95% intact. The painted finish remains 95% intact and still retains a very good matte appearance; not being effected by patina and collector handling. The inside of the helmet remains in factory condition with a factory installed reinforced aluminum liner. I cannot make out the dome stamp. The chinstrap is an early M27 style which we often see on early M35s. Unfortunately it has been the victim of rough handling and the carbine hook has broken off of the long-end of the strap. Overall this helmet has very good “shelf appeal”. ON HOLD

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Item 824 M42 Helmet

This is an EF64 M42 no decal helmet with 95% original paint. The liner remains intact and sound. The chinstrap is a rare example of one which was not dyed black by the manufacturer. It is broken on the short buckle end. There is a slight dent to the helmet shell at wearers right just at the air-vent. A very good late war example with a visible dome-stamp  SOLD

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Item 822 US M1 Helmet w/ fixed bales

This is one f the most minty US M1 helmets that I have ever seen. The shell exterior retains 99.5% of it’s original textured paint. There are only two noticeable scratches at the front of the helmet shell. The liner is a firestone with early green/grey anodized “A” washers holding the suspension. The liner chinstrap is a mint condition example with early green hardware. The chinstrap is ID’d by laundry number to the soldier who wore it. I honestly don’t think you are liable to find a better, cleaner example. SOLD

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Item 790 M35 Double decal army Helmet

This helmet would satisfy even the most discerning of collectors. Made by NS (size 64) in 1939 the original factory paint remains 98% intact with only minor scratches. The color is excellent as is the matte quality; not having been altered by patina or collector handling. The decals have held up remarkably and both are in 98% condition. The eagle being a textbook factory applied C.A. Pocher (the only decal used by NS from 1936 until 1943). The liner frame is dated 1939 and is infested with dust and greebles that we all want to see in an untouched helmet. The acceptance stamp appears to have been applied with a half-dry stamp because only about half of it transferred to the metal of the dome. The chinstrap is an early aluminum mounted type but hard as I try, I cannot make out the manufacture or date marking. Overall, this one is a top-shelf example. SOLD

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Item 769 M18 Double decal transition Helmet

This is a good example of a very rare helmet; being an M1918 special model known as the ear-cut-out. It was upgraded twice in it’s life. The first time, the M18 liner was re-installed with upgraded split-pins of late 1920s vintage and the M27 chinstrap replaced the original M18 type. Later the helmet over-painted in feldgrau and  early C.A. Pocher Heer insignias applied at the sides. Most likely this last modification occurred in 1934 or 1935. as later re-issued helmets tended t be upgraded with the newly produced M31 liners. This exact helmet was profiled in my first book “Germany combat helmets”; Pages 211-212, published in 2009. $6450.00

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Item 727 M18 Rework single decal army Helmet

This one has stunning paint and an early Methner & Berger army decal with grey detail lines. The wartime steel framed liner shows moderate wear but is fully intact and sound. The chinstrap is an original that has brown dye on it; indicating it was used by the Norwegians in the post-war era (1940s-1960s) and added to this helmet by a collector in recent years.  She makes a lovely example. $985.00

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Item 723 M35 Double decal Luftwaffe Helmet

This is an ET60 helmet with 97% of it’s original paint and the decals rate at about 90%. The finish of the helmet is in great shape with even coloring and little effects of handling wear and patina. The size 53 liner appears nearly unworn. The original drawstring is present. The liner frame is dated 1938. The chinstrap is an original but is likely been replaced onto this helmet. A wonderful example; if a bit on the small size. $2000.00

 

 

Below are some links to pages which you might enjoy looking at.

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Formal studio portarait of Oberfeldwebel Johann Schwerdfeger, a pre-war professional soldier, probably created in connection with his award of the Eichenlaub zum Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes (Oak Leaves to the Knight’s Cross of the Iron Cross), received in 14 May 1944 when he served as a Zugführer (platoon leader) in the 1.Kompanie / I.Bataillon / Jäger-Regiment 228 / 101.Jäger-Division. Schwerdfeger soldiered from 1935 to 1937 in Infanterie-Regiment 84, and in 1939 was transferred to the third company of Infanterie-Regiment 186 of the 73. Infanterie-Division, at the Polish Campaign’s start. In June 1942, after serving in Jägerersatzbataillon 75, Schwerdfeger joined Jäger-Regiment 228 of the 101. Jäger-Division, who fought in the Don Bend, at Rostov, and at Maikop, in the Caucasus, and joined the retreat through the Kuban and the Taman Peninsula. On 17 May 1943 Schwerdfeger was awarded the Ritterkreuz (Knight’s Cross) for his extraordinary bravery in the battlefield. In April 1944, in the breakout from Hube’s Pocket, he was severely wounded, and was awarded the Eichenlaub for his Ritterkreuz; moreover, Sergeant Schwerdfeger also earned two Panzervernichtungsabzeichen (tank destruction badges), meaning that he singlehandedly destroyed two enemy tanks with hand-held weapon. Schwerdfeger was able to recover from his wounds sustained in Hube’s Pocket and served the remainder of the war. He passed away in December 2015. The novel, “The Willing Flesh”, by veteran Willi Heinrich, and the famous World War II movie “Cross of Iron” (based on the novel), is generally recognised as being loosely based on Schwerdfeger’s experiences as an NCO in Jäger-Regiment 228 in the course of that unit’s retreat through the Kuban and Taman Peninsula in the late stages of the war. 

Be sure to click on this link check out my other website dedicated to other kinds of Militaria

Contact information:

To order or to ask questions:

 E-mail address: wii1944@aol.com

Mailing address:

Ken Niewiarowicz
P.O.Box 582
Lapeer, MI 48446